GM all-electric Chevy Equinox goes on sale as the latest test for EV production and demand

GM’s 2024 Chevrolet Equinox EV during a media launch event for the vehicle on May 16, 2024 in Detroit.

Michael Wayland / CNBC

DETROIT — The Chevrolet Equinox has been a crucial part of General Motors’ lineup for two decades. The vehicle is a quintessential family hauler and a go-to car for people seeking an economical compact crossover for everyday driving.

GM is hoping the 2024 Chevrolet Equinox EV can do the same for its growing all-electric vehicle portfolio as it begins shipping the crossover to dealers amid slower-than-expected demand for EVs. The rollout marks the latest test for mass-market adoption as well as the company’s production of new “Ultium” EV technologies.

“It’s very important to us but, more importantly, it’s very important to customers and people who want affordability and electric vehicles,” GM President Mark Reuss told CNBC last week. “This is about $27,500 [including up to $7,500 in federal incentives] for an over 300-mile range car, which is right in the heart of everything.”

Offering a new EV for around $25,000 has long been a target for automakers such as GM, Tesla and others. The importance of such a vehicle has grown more apparent as Chinese automakers like BYD and Nio grow their sales of less expensive EVs outside of China.

The Equinox EV is launching with higher-priced models that start at roughly $43,000 to $51,100 (without any incentives). The entry-level Equinox LT model, starting at about $35,000, is expected later this year.

“The Equinox EV is the vehicle that’s really going to make a difference for a lot of customers that maybe previously haven’t been interested or looked at EVs,” Kathleen Murawski, marketing and advertising manager for gas-powered and Equinox EVs and Chevy Blazer EVs, told CNBC.

GM sells hundreds of thousands of gas-powered Equinox crossovers annually, including 212,701 last year. The crossover is typically one of GM’s bestselling vehicles and top five in sales for its segment, according to Autopacific.

Testing GM

The Equinox EV is GM’s new entry point for all-electric vehicles in the U.S. after the automaker discontinued the Chevy Bolt last year. It’s expected to be GM’s top-selling EV.

With such lofty sales expectations, it also will test the legacy automaker’s ability to successfully mass produce an Ultium-based EV following pricier vehicles such as the $110,000 GMC Hummer EV, $60,000 Cadillac Lyriq and a botched launch of the Blazer EV, starting at roughly $55,000, due to software issues.

“We’ve got the launch on this vehicle right. We’ve got the quality of this vehicle right. We’ve got the software of this vehicle right. We’re just super excited to see now where it goes,” GM President of Global Markets Rory Harvey told CNBC. “We think we’ve got a product that’s out there to win.”

The Equinox EV is arriving to market following the Blazer EV and alongside GM’s more than $96,000 Silverado EV RST. The company has already launched a work truck version of the Silverado EV.

The production ramp-up of GM’s new EV vehicles — using what the automaker calls its “Ultium” platform, batteries and other technologies — has been slower than the company and investors had expected. The Equinox will change that, according to GM North America President Marissa West.

“We’ve eliminated the production constraints, and now it’s about meeting the customer demand with the most affordable, longest-range vehicle on the market in the heart of our Chevrolet lineup, which is … the heart and soul of General Motors,” West said during an interview Monday.

Paul Waatti, director of industry analysis at AutoPacific, agrees. He called the Equinox a critical product for GM’s EV plans as well as a potential redemption opportunity for the company following its disappointing ramp-up of current Ultium-based products.

“GM is going to start to see real volume in their EV portfolio,” Waatti said. “It was a slow start, but now they’re going to have the big volume players in the mix. It’s really a turning point for GM.”

“[The Equinox is] undoubtedly the most significant Ultium launch for GM yet,” he added. “It might just be the most compelling EV on the market right now.”

Equinox EV

All of that being said, the Equinox EV is an Equinox in name only. It shares little to nothing with the traditional gas-powered vehicle, which the company redesigned to look more rugged for the 2025 model year.

The Equinox EV is wider and lower than the traditional crossover. It’s a result of GM’s Ultium EV platform, aerodynamics and other targeted features for the vehicle, including an up to EPA-estimated 319 miles of range on a single charge.

A standard front-wheel-drive Equinox EV has a 213 horsepower and 236 foot-pounds of torque, according to company estimates. GM says optional all-wheel-drive models have an estimated 288-horsepower and 333 foot-pounds of torque.

Outside of the U.S., the Equinox EV will be sold in Canada, Mexico, the Middle East and some South American markets such as Brazil.

GM’s 2024 Chevrolet Equinox EV (right) next to a gas-powered Chevy Equinox on May 16, 2024 in Detroit.

Michael Wayland / CNBC

Brad Franz, director of Chevy car and crossover marketing, said retaining the familiar names for the EVs was a “strategic decision” to leverage names people know and trust.

“The Chevy proposition here is these can make your life easier. Not only easier, but better,” he said Thursday during a media event. “How are we going to tackle that? We’ll start with just leveraging our brand reputation.”

Keeping the same names also aligns with the company’s target to exclusively offer EVs to consumers by 2035. While the automaker hasn’t shifted that goalpost in light of slower-than-expected sales of EVs, it has recently shifted its messaging to note the transition will be based on customer demand.

GM ranked fourth in U.S. market share of all-electric vehicles during the first quarter, representing 6.1% of new EVs sold, according to data provided by Motor Intelligence. Tesla, at 52.3%, is by far the leader in estimated U.S. EV sales, followed by Hyundai, including Kia, at 9.3% and Ford Motor at 7.5%.

Don’t miss these exclusives from CNBC PRO

Source link

#allelectric #Chevy #Equinox #sale #latest #test #production #demand

China’s automakers must adapt quickly or lose out on the EV boom in the face of regulatory scrutiny abroad and competition at home

Chinese new energy vehicle giant shows off the latest version of its Han electric sedan at the Beijing auto show on April 26, 2024.

CNBC | Evelyn Cheng

BEIJING — Chinese automakers, including state-owned auto giant GAC Group, can’t afford to take it easy in the country’s electric car boom if they want to survive.

Adoption of battery and hybrid-powered cars has surged in China, but an onslaught of new models has fueled a price war that’s forced Tesla to also cut its prices. While Chinese automakers also look overseas for growth, other countries are increasingly wary of the impact of the cars on domestic auto industries, requiring investment in local production. It’s now survival of the fittest in China’s already competitive EV market.

“The speed of elimination will only pick up,” Feng Xingya, president at GAC, told reporters on the sidelines of the Beijing auto show in late April. That’s according to a CNBC translation of his Mandarin-language remarks.

GAC slashed prices on its cars one week before the May 1 Labor Day holiday in China, Feng said, noting the price war contributed to its first-quarter sales slump. The automaker’s operating revenue fell year-on-year in the first quarter for the first time since 2020, according to Wind Information.

To stay competitive, Feng said GAC is partnering with tech companies such as Huawei, while working on in-house research and development. The automaker is the joint venture partner of Honda and Toyota in China, and has an electric car brand called Aion.

“In the short term, if your product isn’t good, then consumers won’t buy it,” Feng said. “You need to use the best tech and the best products to satisfy consumer needs. In the long term, you must have a core competitive edge.”

Expanding outside China

Factories go global

Part of GAC’s international strategy is to localize production, Wei said, noting the company is using a variety of approaches such as joint ventures and technology partnerships. He said GAC opened a factory in Malaysia in April and plans to open another in Thailand in June, with Egypt, Brazil and Turkey also under consideration.

GAC plans to establish eight subsidiaries this year, including in Amsterdam, Wei said. But the U.S. isn’t part of the company’s near-term overseas expansion plans, he said.

The difference today is that the overcapacity now has come together with vehicles that are very competitive

Stephen Dyer

AlixPartners, co-leader of the Greater China Business

U.S. and European officials have in recent months emphasized the need to address China’s “overcapacity,” which can be loosely defined as state-supported production of goods that exceeds demand. China has pushed back on such concerns and its Ministry of Commerce claimed that, from a global perspective, new energy faces a capacity shortage.

“There’s always been overcapacity in the Chinese auto industry,” said Stephen Dyer, co-leader of the Greater China business at consulting firm AlixPartners, and Asia leader for its automotive and industrials practice.

“The difference today is that the overcapacity now has come together with vehicles that are very competitive,” he told CNBC on the sidelines of the auto show. “So in our EV survey I was surprised to find that about 73% of U.S. consumers could recognize at least one Chinese EV brand. And Europe was close behind.”

Dyer expects that to drive overseas demand for Chinese electric cars. AlixPartners’ survey found that BYD had the highest brand recognition across the U.S. and major European countries, followed by Nio and Leap Motor.

BYD exported 242,000 cars last year and is also building factories overseas. The company’s sales are roughly split between hybrid and battery-powered vehicles. BYD no longer sells traditional fuel-powered passenger cars.

Tech competition

In addition to price, this year’s auto show in Beijing reflected how companies — Chinese and foreign — are competing on tech such as driver-assist software.

Chinese consumers placed almost twice as much importance on tech features compared with U.S. consumers, Dyer said, citing AlixPartners’ survey.

He noted how Chinese startups are so aggressive that a car may be sold with new tech, even if the software still has problems. “They know they can use over-the-air updates to rapidly fix bugs or add features as needed,” Dyer said.

Interest in tech doesn’t mean consumers are sold on battery-only cars. Dyer said that in the short term, consumers are still worried about driving range — meaning that hybrids are not only in demand, but often used without charging the battery.

Elon Musk meets with China's Premier Li Qiang to discuss Tesla, full-self driving and restrictions

Even Volkswagen is getting in on the “smart tech” race. The German auto giant revealed at the auto show its joint venture with Shanghai’s state-owned SAIC Motor teamed up with Chinese drone company DJI’s automotive unit to create a driver-assist system for the newly launched Tiguan L Pro.

The initial version of the SUV is fuel-powered, for which the company’s tagline is: “oil or electric, both are smart,” according to a CNBC translation of the Chinese.

Battery manufacturer CATL had a more prominent exhibition booth this year, likely in the hope of encouraging consumers to buy cars with its batteries, as competitors’ market share grows, said Zhong Shi, an analyst with the China Automobile Dealers Association.

Automotive chip companies Black Sesame and Horizon Robotics also had booths inside the main exhibition hall.

What customers want

Lotus Technology, a high-end U.K. car brand acquired by Geely, found in a survey of its customers their top requests were for automatic parking and battery charging, which would allow drivers to stay in the car.

That’s according to CFO Alexious Kuen Long Lee, who spoke with CNBC on the sidelines of the Beijing auto show. He noted the company now has robotic battery chargers in Shanghai.

Lotus and Nio last week also announced a strategic partnership on battery swapping and charging.

“I think there is a handing over of the baton where the Chinese brands are becoming much bigger and much stronger, and the foreign brands are still trying to decide what’s the best energy route,” said Lee, who’s worked in China since 1998. “Are they still deciding on the PHEV, are they still thinking about BEVs, are they still thinking about the internal combustion cars? The entire decision-making process becomes so complex, with so much resistance internally, that I think they’re just not being productive.”

But he thinks Lotus has found the right strategy by expanding its product line, and going straight to battery-powered cars. “Lotus today,” he said, “is similar to what international brands’ position [was] in China, probably back in 2000.”

Source link

#Chinas #automakers #adapt #quickly #lose #boom #face #regulatory #scrutiny #competition #home

Friday’s S&P 500 and Nasdaq-100 rebalance may reflect concerns over concentration risk

It’s arguably the biggest stock story of 2023: a small number of giant technology companies now make up a very large part of big indexes like the S&P 500 and the Nasdaq-100. 

Five companies (Apple, Microsoft, Amazon, Nvidia and Alphabet) make up about 25% of the S&P 500. Six companies (Apple, Microsoft, Amazon, Nvidia, Alphabet and Broadcom) make up about 40% of the Nasdaq-100. 

The S&P 500 and the Nasdaq are rebalancing their respective indexes this Friday. While this is a routine event, some of the changes may reflect the concerns over concentration risk. 

A ton of money is pegged to a few indexes 

Now that the CPI and the Fed meeting are out of the way, these rebalances are the last major “liquidity events” of the year, corresponding with another notable trading event: triple witching, or the quarterly expiration of stock options, index options and index futures. 

This is an opportunity for the trading community to move large blocks of stock for the last gasps of tax loss harvesting or to position for the new year. Trading volume will typically drop 30%-40% in the final two weeks of the year after triple witching, with only the final trading day showing significant volume.

All of this might appear of only academic interest, but the big move to passive index investing in the past 20 years has made these events more important to investors. 

When these indexes are adjusted, either because of additions or deletions, or because share counts change, or because the weightings are changed to reduce the influence of the largest companies, it means a lot of money moves in and out of mutual funds and ETFs that are directly or indirectly tied to the indexes. 

Standard & Poor’s estimates that nearly $13 trillion is directly or indirectly indexed to the S&P 500. The three largest ETFs (SPDR S&P 500 ETF Trust, iShares Core S&P 500 ETF, and Vanguard S&P 500 ETF) are all directly indexed to the S&P 500 and collectively have nearly $1.2 trillion in assets under management. 

Linked to the Nasdaq-100 — the 100 largest nonfinancial companies listed on Nasdaq — the Invesco QQQ Trust (QQQ) is the fifth-largest ETF, with roughly $220 billion in assets under management. 

S&P 500: Apple and others will be for sale. Uber going in 

For the S&P 500, Standard & Poor’s will adjust the weighting of each stock to account for changes in share count. Share counts typically change because many companies have large buyback programs that reduce share count. 

This quarter, Apple, Alphabet, Comcast, Exxon Mobil, Visa and Marathon Petroleum will all see their share counts reduced, so funds indexed to the S&P will have to reduce their weighting. 

S&P 500: Companies with share count reduction

(% of share count reduction)

  • Apple        0.5%
  • Alphabet   1.3%
  • Comcast    2.4%
  • Exxon Mobil  1.0%
  • Visa                0.8%
  • Marathon Petroleum  2.6%

Source: S&P Global

Other companies (Nasdaq, EQT, and Amazon among them) will see their share counts increased, so funds indexed to the S&P 500 will have to increase their weighting. 

In addition, three companies are being added to the S&P 500: Uber, Jabil, and Builders FirstSource.  I wrote about the effect that being added to the S&P was having on Uber‘s stock price last week.  

Three other companies are being deleted and will go from the S&P 500 to the S&P SmallCap 600 index: Sealed Air, Alaska Air and SolarEdge Technologies

Nasdaq-100 changes: DoorDash, MongoDB, Splunk are in 

The Nasdaq-100 is rebalanced four times a year; however, the annual reconstitution, where stocks are added or deleted, happens only in December. 

Last Friday, Nasdaq announced that six companies would be added to the Nasdaq-100: CDW Corporation (CDW), Coca-Cola Europacific Partners (CCEP), DoorDash (DASH), MongoDB (MDB), Roper Technologies (ROP), and Splunk (SPLK). 

Six others will be deleted: Align Technology (ALGN), eBay (EBAY), Enphase Energy (ENPH), JD.com (JD), Lucid Group (LCID), and Zoom Video Communications (ZM).

Concentration risk: The rules

Under federal law, a diversified investment fund (mutual funds, exchange-traded funds), even if it just mimics an index like the S&P 500, has to satisfy certain diversification requirements. This includes requirements that: 1) no single issuer can account for more than 25% of the total assets of the portfolio, and 2) securities that represent more than 5% of the total assets cannot exceed 50% of the total portfolio. 

Most of the major indexes have similar requirements in their rules. 

For example, there are 11 S&P sector indexes that are the underlying indexes for widely traded ETFs such as the Technology Select SPDR ETF (XLK). The rules for these sector indexes are similar to the rules on diversification requirements for investment funds discussed above. For example, the S&P sector indexes say that a single stock cannot exceed 24% of the float-adjusted market capitalization of that sector index and that the sum of the companies with weights greater than 4.8% cannot exceed 50% of the total index weight. 

At the end of last week, three companies had weights greater than 4.8% in the Technology Select Sector (Microsoft at 23.5%, Apple at 22.8%, and Broadcom at 4.9%) and their combined market weight was 51.2%, so if those same prices hold at the close on Friday, there should be a small reduction in Apple and Microsoft in that index. 

S&P will announce if there are changes in the sector indexes after the close on Friday. 

The Nasdaq-100 also uses a “modified” market-capitalization weighting scheme, which can constrain the size of the weighting for any given stock to address overconcentration risk. This rebalancing may reduce the weighting in some of the largest stocks, including Apple, Microsoft, Amazon, Nvidia and Alphabet. 

The move up in these large tech stocks was so rapid in the first half of the year that Nasdaq took the unusual step of initiating a special rebalance in the Nasdaq-100 in July to address the overconcentration of the biggest names. As a result, Microsoft, Apple, Nvidia, Amazon and Tesla all saw their weightings reduced. 

Market concentration is nothing new

Whether the rules around market concentration should be tightened is open for debate, but the issue has been around for decades.

For example, Phil Mackintosh and Robert Jankiewicz from Nasdaq recently noted that the weight of the five largest companies in the S&P 500 was also around 25% back in the 1970s.

Disclosure: Comcast is the corporate parent of NBCUniversal and CNBC.

Source link

#Fridays #Nasdaq100 #rebalance #reflect #concerns #concentration #risk

Jim Cramer’s top 10 things to watch in the stock market Friday

My top 10 things to watch Friday, Dec. 8

1. U.S. stocks are lower in midmorning trading, with S&P 500 futures down 0.3% and on track to break a five-week winning streak. But the Nasdaq Composite, down 0.55% in early trading, looks set to post a sixth-consecutive week of gains. Bond yields tick up slightly, with that of the 10-year Treasury hovering just below 4.2%.

2. Oil prices pare some of their recent losses, climbing by more than 2% Thursday morning. West Texas Intermediate crude, the U.S. oil benchmark, is now back above $70 a barrel but is still down for seven-straight weeks.

3. Club holding Honeywell International reaches a deal to buy Carrier Global‘s security business for $4.95 billion. Carrier will reportedly use the money from Honeywell to accelerate its debt paydown. The companies expect the all-cash transaction to close before the end of the third quarter of 2024.

4. Club holding Broadcom reports mixed fiscal fourth-quarter results, missing on revenue but delivering strong profits. And tailwinds from artificial intelligence and the company’s acquisition of VMware should keep profits growing and more than offset some of the cyclical parts of the semiconductor business.

5. Mizuho raises its price target on Broadcom to $1,000 a share, up from $960, while maintaining a buy rating on the stock. The firm cites the semiconductor firm’s strong guidance, along with its industry-leading margins and free cash flow.

6. India’s Tata Group plans to build one of the country’s biggest iPhone assembly plants, with roughly 20 assembly lines and 50,000 workers, Bloomberg reports. The new factory would help Club holding Apple in its efforts to diversify its supply chain and expand its presence in India.

7. Morgan Stanley raises its price target on Apple to $220 a share, up from $210, while reiterating an overweight rating on the stock. The firm says the macroeconomic backdrop is still a challenge for Apple, but argues that excitement around Edge AI, services, and gross margin strength “reignites the bull case.”

8. Bernstein calls Tesla a “best idea,” outlining the short case for the electric-vehicle maker in 2024. “In our view, Tesla’s key challenge is that it has a demand problem due to its narrow (and expensive) product family of essentially two vehicles,” Bernstein analysts write. The firm has an underperform rating on Tesla stock, with a price target on $150 a share.

9. Mizuho raises its price target on DoorDash to $120 a share, up from $105, while reiterating a buy rating on the stock. The firm expects continued margin expansion, as the food-delivery platform continues to gain market share.

10. Lululemon Athletica delivers strong third-quarter results, while reporting a positive start to the holiday shopping season. The athletic-apparel retailer receives a slew of price-target raises Friday from Wall Street firms — including Barclays, which goes to $530 a share, up from $480, with a buy rating on the stock.

Sign up for my Top 10 Morning Thoughts on the Market email newsletter for free.

(See here for a full list of the stocks at Jim Cramer’s Charitable Trust.)

What Investing Club members are reading right now

As a subscriber to the CNBC Investing Club with Jim Cramer, you will receive a trade alert before Jim makes a trade. Jim waits 45 minutes after sending a trade alert before buying or selling a stock in his charitable trust’s portfolio. If Jim has talked about a stock on CNBC TV, he waits 72 hours after issuing the trade alert before executing the trade.

THE ABOVE INVESTING CLUB INFORMATION IS SUBJECT TO OUR TERMS AND CONDITIONS AND PRIVACY POLICY, TOGETHER WITH OUR DISCLAIMER.  NO FIDUCIARY OBLIGATION OR DUTY EXISTS, OR IS CREATED, BY VIRTUE OF YOUR RECEIPT OF ANY INFORMATION PROVIDED IN CONNECTION WITH THE INVESTING CLUB.  NO SPECIFIC OUTCOME OR PROFIT IS GUARANTEED.

Source link

#Jim #Cramers #top #watch #stock #market #Friday

As the market enters correction territory, don’t blame the American consumer

An Amazon.com Inc worker prepares an order in which the buyer asked for an item to be gift wrapped at a fulfillment center in Shakopee, Minnesota, U.S., November 12, 2020.

Amazon.com Inc | Reuters

The initial third-quarter report on gross domestic product showed consumer spending zooming higher by 4% percent a year, after inflation, the best in almost two years. September’s retail sales report showed spending climbing almost twice as fast as the average for the last year. And yet, bears like hedge-fund trader Bill Ackman argue that a recession is coming as soon as this quarter and the market has entered correction territory.

For an economy that rises or falls on the state of the consumer, third-quarter earnings data supports a view of spending that remains mostly good. S&P 500 consumer-discretionary companies that have reported through Oct. 25 saw an average profit gain of 15%, according to CFRA — the biggest revenue gain of the stock market’s 11 sectors.

“People are kind of scratching their heads and saying, ‘The consumer is holding up better than expected,'” said CFRA Research strategist Sam Stovall said. “Consumers are employed. They continue to buy goods as well as pursue experiences. And they don’t seem worried about debt levels.” 

How is this possible with interest rates on everything from credit cards to cars and homes soaring?

It’s the anecdotes from bellwether companies across key industries that tell the real story: Delta Air Lines and United Airlines sharing how their most expensive seats are selling fastest. Homeowners using high-interest-rate-fighting mortgage buydowns. Amazon saying it’s hiring 250,000 seasonal workers. A Thursday report from Deckers Outdoor blew some minds — in what has been a tepid clothing sales environment — by disclosing that embedded in a 79% profit gain that sent shares up 19% was sales of Uggs, a mature line anchored by fuzzy boots, rising 28%.

The picture they paint largely matches the economic data — generally positive, but with some warts. Here is some of the key evidence from from the biggest company earnings reports across the market that help explain how companies and the American consumer are making the best of a tough rate environment.

How homebuilders are solving for mortgages rates

No industry is more central to the market’s notion that the consumer is falling from the sky than housing, because the number of existing home sales have dropped almost 40% from Covid-era peaks. But while Coldwell Banker owner Anywhere Real Estate saw profit fall by half, news from builders of new homes has been pretty good.

Most consumers have mortgages below 5%, but for new homebuyers, one reason that rates are not biting quite as sharply as they should is that builders have figured out ways around the 8% interest rates that are bedeviling existing home sellers. That helps explains why new home sales are up this year. Homebuilders are dipping into money that previously paid for other incentives to pay for offering mortgages at 5.75% rather than the 8% level other mortgages have hit. At PulteGroup, the nation’s third-biggest builder, that helped drive an 8% third-quarter profit jump and 43% climb in new home orders for delivery later, much better than the government-reported 4.5% gain in new home sales year-to-date.

“What we’ve done is simply redistribute incentives we’ve historically offered toward cabinets and countertops, and redirected those to interest rate incentives,” PulteGroup CEO Ryan Marshall said. “And that has been the most powerful thing.”

The mechanics are complex, but work out to this: Pulte sets aside about $35,000 for incentives to get each home to sell, or about 6% of its price, the company said on its earnings conference call. Part of that is paying for a mortgage buydown. About 80% to 85% of buyers are taking advantage of the buydown offer. But many are splitting the funds, mixing a smaller rate buydown and keeping some goodies for the house, the company said.

Wells Fargo economist Jackie Benson said in a report that builders may struggle to keep this strategy going if mortgage rates stay near 8%, but new-home prices have dropped 12% in the last year. In her view, incentives plus bigger price cuts than most existing homes’ owners will offer is giving builders an edge. 

At auto companies, price cuts are in, and more are coming

Car sales picked up notably in September, rising 24% year-over-year, more than twice the year-to-date gain in unit sales. But they were below expectations at electric-vehicle leader Tesla, which blamed high interest rates, and at Ford

“I just can’t emphasize this enough, that for the vast majority of people buying a car it’s about the monthly payment,” Tesla CEO Elon Musk said on its earnings call. “And as interest rates rise, the proportion of that monthly payment that is interest increases.” 

Maybe, but that’s not what’s happening at General Motors, even if investor reaction to good numbers at GM was muted because of the strike by the United Auto Workers union. 

GM tops Q3 expectations but pulls full-year guidance due to mounting UAW strike costs

GM beat earnings expectations by 40 cents a share, but shares fell 3% because of investor worries about the strike, which forced GM to withdraw its fourth-quarter earnings forecast on Oct. 24. Ford, which settled with the UAW on Oct. 25, said the next day it had a “mixed” quarter, as profit missed Wall Street targets due to the strike. Consumers came through, as unit sales rose 7.7% for the quarter, with truck and EV sales both up 15%. GM CEO Mary Barra said on GM’s analyst call that the company gained market share, posting a 21% gain in unit sales despite offering incentives below the industry average.

“While we hear reports out there in the macro that consumer sentiment might be weakening, etc., we haven’t seen that in demand for our vehicles,” GM CFO Paul Jacobson told analysts. But Ford CFO John Lawler said car prices need to decline by about $1,800 to be as affordable as they were before Covid. “We think it’s going to happen over 12 to 18 months,” he said. 

Tesla’s turnaround plan turns on continuing to lower its cost of producing cars, which came down by about $2,000 per vehicle in last year, the company said. Along with federal tax credits for electric vehicles, a Model Y crossover can be had for about $36,490, or as little as $31,500 in states with local tax incentives for EVs. That’s way below the average for all cars, which Cox Automotive puts at more than $50,000. But Musk says some consumers still aren’t convincible. .

“When you look at the price reductions we’ve made in, say, the Model Y, and you compare that to how much people’s monthly payment has risen due to interest rates, the price of the Model Y is almost unchanged,” Musk said. “They can’t afford it.”

Most banks say the consumer still has cash, but not Discover

To know how consumers are doing, ask the banks, which disclose consumer balances quarterly. To know if they’re confident, ask the credit card companies (often the same companies) how much they are spending. 

In most cases, financial services firms say consumers are doing well.

At Bank of America, consumer balances are still about one-third higher than before Covid, CEO Brian Moynihan said on the company’s conference call. At JPMorgan Chase, balances have eroded 3% in the last year, but consumer loan delinquencies declined during the quarter, the company said.

“Where am I seeing softness in [consumer] credit?” said chief financial officer Jeremy Barnum, repeating an analyst’s question on the earnings call. “I think the answer to that is actually nowhere.”

Among credit card companies, the “resilient” is still the main story. MasterCard, in fact, used that word or “resilience” eight times to describe U.S. consumers in its Oct. 26 call.

“I mean, the reality is, unemployment levels are [near] all-time record lows,” MasterCard chief financial officer Sachin Mehra said.

At American Express, which saw U.S. consumer spending rise 9%, the mild surprise was the company’s disclosure that young consumers are adding Amex cards faster than any other group. Millennials and Gen Zers saw their U.S. spending via Amex rise 18%, the company said.

“Guess they’re not bothered by the resumption of student loan payments,” Stovall said.

Consumer data is more positive than sentiment, says Bankrate's Ted Rossman

The major fly in the ointment came from Discover Financial Services, one of the few banks to make big additions to its loan loss reserves for consumer debt, driving a 33% drop in profit as Discover’s loan chargeoffs doubled.  

Despite the fact that U.S. household debt burdens are almost exactly the same as in late 2019, and declined during the quarter, according to government data, Discover chief financial officer John Greene said on its call, “Our macro assumptions reflect a relatively strong labor market but also consumer headwinds from a declining savings rate and increasing debt burdens.”

At airlines, still no sign of a travel recession

It’s good to be Delta Air Lines right now, sitting on a 59% third-quarter profit gain driven by the most expensive products on their virtual shelves: First-class seats and international vacations. Also good to be United, where higher-margin international travel rose almost 25% and the company is planning to add seven first-class seats per departure by 2027. Not so good to be discounter Spirit, which saw shares fall after reporting a $157 million loss.

“With the market continuing to seemingly will a travel recession into existence despite evidence to the contrary from daily [government] data and our consumer surveys, Delta’s third-quarter beat and solid fourth-quarter guide and commentary should finally put the group at ease about a consumer “cliff,” allow them to unfasten their seatbelts and walk about the cabin,” Morgan Stanley analyst Ravi Shanker said in a note to clients.

One tangible impact: United is adding 20 planes this quarter, though it is pushing 12 more deliveries into 2024, while Spirit said it’s delaying plane deliveries, and focusing on its proposed merger with JetBlue and cost-cutting to regain competitiveness as soft demand for its product persists into the holiday season.

As has been the case throughout much of 2023, richer consumers — who contribute the greater share of spending — are doing better than moderate-income families, Sundaram said.

The goods recession is for real

Whirlpool, Ethan Allen and mattress maker Sleep Number all saw their stocks tumble after reporting bad earnings, all of them experiencing sales struggles consistent with the macro data.

This follows a trend now well-entrenched in the economy: people stocked up on hard goods, especially for the house, during the pandemic, when they were stuck at home more. All three companies saw shares surge during Covid, and growth has slacked off since as they found their markets at least partly saturated and consumers moved spending to travel and other services.

“All of the stimulus money went to the furniture industry,” Sundaram said, exaggerating for effect. “Now they’ve been falling apart for the last year.”

Ethan Allen sales dropped 24%, as the company said a flood in a Vermont factory and softer demand were among the causes. At Whirlpool, which said in second-quarter earnings that it was moving to make up slowing sales to consumers by selling more appliances to home builders, “discretionary purchases have been even softer than anticipated, as a result of increased mortgage rates and low consumer confidence,” CEO Marc Bitzer said during Thursday’s earnings call. Its shares fell more than 20%. 

Amazon’s $1.3 billion holiday hiring spree

Amazon is making its biggest-ever commitment to holiday hiring, spending $1.3 billion to add the workers, mostly in fulfillment centers. 

That’s possible because Amazon has reorganized its warehouse network to speed up deliveries and lower costs, sparking 11% sales gains the last two quarters as consumers turn to the online giant for more everyday repeat purchases. Amazon also tends to serve a more affluent consumer who is proving more resilient in the face of interest rate hikes and inflation than audiences for Target or dollar stores, according to CFRA retailing analyst Arun Sundaram said.

“Their retail sales are performing really well,” Sundaram said. “There’s still headwinds affecting discretionary sales, but everyday essentials are doing really well.

All of this sets the stage for a high-stakes holiday season.

PNC still thinks there will be a recession in early 2024, thanks partly to the Federal Reserve’ rate hikes, and thinks investors will focus on sales of goods looking for more signs of weakness. “There’s a lot of strength for the late innings” of an expansion, said PNC Asset Management chief investment officer Amanda Agati.

Sundaram, whose firm has predicted that interest rates will soon drop as inflation wanes, thinks retailers are in better shape, with stronger supply chains that will allow strategic discounting more than last year to pump sales. The Uggs sales outperformance was attributed to improved supply chains and shorter shipping times as the lingering effects of the pandemic recede.

“Though there are headwinds for the consumer, there’s a chance for a decent holiday season,” he said, albeit one hampered still by the inflation of the last two years. “The 2022 holiday season may have been the low point.” 

Deloitte predicts soft holiday sales

Source link

#market #enters #correction #territory #dont #blame #American #consumer

Top Wall Street analysts remain optimistic about these five stocks

The Netflix logo is seen on a TV remote controller in this illustration taken Jan. 20, 2022.

Dado Ruvic | Reuters

As the earnings season rolls on, investors are getting a glimpse into how companies are handling an array of macro pressures.

Analysts can pick apart these quarterly reports and help investors identify companies that can withstand near-term challenges and deliver attractive returns in the long term.

To that end, here are five stocks favored by Wall Street’s top analysts, according to TipRanks, a platform that ranks analysts based on their past performance.

Netflix

Streaming giant Netflix (NFLX) recently delivered a beat on third-quarter earnings per share, with its crackdown on password sharing helping to add more subscribers to its platform.

Evercore analyst Mark Mahaney said that there were several key positives in the company’s third-quarter print, including 8.76 million subscriber additions, stronger-than-anticipated Q4 2023 subscriber addition guidance, and share buybacks of $2.5 billion. He also noted an increase in the 2023 free cash flow outlook to about $6.5 billion, from the previous guidance of at least $5 billion and a price hike for the basic and premium plans.

“We continue to believe that NFLX’s ad-supported offering and password-sharing initiatives constitute major Growth Curve Initiatives [GCI] – catalysts that will drive a material reacceleration in revenue and EPS growth,” said Mahaney.    

The analyst thinks that the company is pursuing these GCI catalysts from a position of strength, given that it is a global streaming leader based on several metrics, including revenue, subscriber base and viewing hours.

Mahaney reiterated a buy rating on NFLX stock with a price target of $500. Interestingly, Mahaney ranks No. 48 among more than 8,500 analysts tracked by TipRanks. His ratings have been profitable 55% of the time, with each delivering a return of 25.4%, on average. (See Netflix Technical Analysis on TipRanks)

Nvidia

Next up is semiconductor giant Nvidia (NVDA). The stock has witnessed a stellar run this year, thanks to demand for NVDA’s chips in building generative artificial intelligence (AI) models and applications.

In a recently updated investor presentation, the company revealed roadmaps for its data center graphics processing units, central processing units and networking chipsets.

JPMorgan analyst Harlan Sur, who holds the 88th position out of more than 8,500 analysts on TipRanks, noted that NVDA’s product roadmaps indicate two major shifts. First, Nvidia has accelerated its product launch timing from a 2-year cycle to a 1-year cycle, which is expected to help the company keep pace with the growing complexity of large language compute workloads.

Regarding the second major shift, Sur said that the roadmaps indicated “more market segmentation (cloud/hyperscale/enterprise) by expanding the number of product SKUs [stock keeping units] that are optimized for a broad spectrum of AI workloads (training/inference).”

The analyst thinks that with these notable developments, the company is taking a multi-pronged approach to strengthen its data center market and technology. He reaffirmed a buy rating on the stock with a price target of $600, noting the growing demand for NVDA’s accelerated compute and networking silicon platforms and software solutions in the development of generative AI and large language models.

Sur’s ratings have been successful 64% of the time, with each rating delivering an average return of 18.2%. (See Nvidia Insider Trading Activity on TipRanks).

Instacart

Grocery delivery platform Instacart (CART) made its much-awaited stock market debut in September. Baird analyst Colin Sebastian recently initiated a buy rating on CART stock with a price target of $31.

Explaining his bullish stance, Sebastian said, “Despite a range of well-financed online and legacy retail competitors, Instacart enjoys an enviable combination of scale, retail integrations, vertical expertise, and proprietary technology.”

The analyst highlighted that the essence of Instacart’s business model is an asset-light partnership strategy. He also thinks that Instacart’s data and technology sophistication are its key competitive advantages. He believes that most food retailers might not be able to build similar internal e-commerce capabilities.

Most importantly, Sebastian views Instacart’s advertising business as one of the most successful launches of retail media, second only to e-commerce behemoth Amazon (AMZN). He pointed out that consumer packaged goods advertisers are promoting their products by leveraging Instacart’s performance ad formats that help in reaching target customers with relevant product ideas.   

Sebastian holds the 340th position among more than 8,500 analysts on TipRanks. His ratings have been successful 52% of the time, with each rating delivering an average return of 10.7%. (See Instacart Options Activity on TipRanks).

SLB

Oilfield services company SLB (SLB), formerly Schlumberger, recently reported better-than-expected third-quarter adjusted earnings. SLB stated that the oil and gas industry continues to gain from a multi-year growth cycle that has shifted to international and offshore markets, where the company claims to enjoy a dominant position.       

Goldman Sachs analyst Neil Mehta contends that while there are no clear near-term catalysts for SLB stock, the long-term growth story remains intact due to resilient customer spending. The analyst highlighted that Saudi Aramco is expected to spend about $245 billion through 2030, reflecting about 5% to 6% annual growth. Further, additional spending (at a modest growth rate) is anticipated from the United Arab Emirates’ ADNOC, Qatar and other players in the region.

Given that 80% of SLB’s revenue is from international and offshore markets, Mehta is confident that the company is well-positioned to leverage the long-term momentum in the Middle East. 

“SLB remains the preferred way to gain exposure to the international and offshore theme, with additional growth drivers in the expansion of its digital footprint with customers, which is margin accretive at ~40-45%, in our view,” said Mehta. 

Calling SLB a structural winner, particularly during pullbacks, Mehta reiterated a buy rating on the stock with a price target of $65. He ranks No. 155 among more than 8,500 analysts tracked by TipRanks. His ratings have been profitable 65% of the time, with each delivering an average return of 12.5%. (See SLB’s Stock Charts on TipRanks) 

Tesla

Our final name this week is electric vehicle maker Tesla (TSLA). The company missed earnings and revenue guidance for the third quarter, with macro pressures, a highly competitive EV market and aggressive price cuts affecting its performance.

Mizuho analyst Vijay Rakesh noted that despite the sequential decline in the company’s Q3 gross and operating margin due to lower pricing and Cybertruck R&D expenses, they remain at the high end of the margins of legacy automakers and way above rival EV makers’ margins.

The analyst lowered his price target for TSLA stock to $310 from $330 to reflect near-term headwinds like margin pressure, macro weakness and Cybertruck ramp challenges. Nevertheless, he reiterated a buy rating, noting that the stock still trades at a discount to disruptors such as Nvidia, while also generating profitability at scale.

“We believe TSLA is prioritizing market share, technology, and cost leadership and is better positioned than peers to weather any turbulence to the broader Auto market,” said Rakesh.

Rakesh ranks No. 82 among more than 8,500 analysts tracked by TipRanks. His ratings have been profitable 57% of the time, with each delivering a return of 18.6%, on average. (See Tesla Financial Statements on TipRanks)

Source link

#Top #Wall #Street #analysts #remain #optimistic #stocks

Jim Cramer’s top 10 things to watch in the stock market Monday

My top 10 things to watch Monday, July 24

1. Chevron (CVX) on Sunday announced excellent preliminary second-quarter results, while extending the contract of CEO Mike Wirth. The United States’ second-largest oil firm in May announced an agreement to expand its shale operations by acquiring PDC Energy (PDCE) in a deal valued at $7.6 billion, including debt. Chevron is set to release its full second-quarter report on Friday.

2. Truist on Monday lowered its price target on Club oil name Pioneer Natural Resources (PXD) to $196 a share, from $220, while maintaining a hold rating on the stock. The firm said it expects free cash flow for most exploration-and-production firms like Pioneer to be down over 50% given lower commodity prices.

3. Piper Sandler on Monday downgraded Club name Estee Lauder (EL) to neutral, from a buy-equivalent rating. The firm also lowered its price target on the cosmetics firm to $195 a share, down from $265. This is the result of of the downfall of the Chinese consumer, which seems endless.

4. Deutsche Bank on Monday raised its price target on Club holding Apple (AAPL) to $210 a share, up from $180, citing upside to the tech giant’s iPhone, Mac and services revenues. Apple is set to report fiscal third-quarter results on Aug. 3.

5. UBS on Monday downgraded electric-vehicle maker Tesla (TSLA) to hold, from buy, noting “very limited” upside to the company’s share price going forward. Still, the firm raised its price target on Tesla to $270 a share, up from $220.

6. Mizuho on Monday raised its price target on Club holding Nvidia (NVDA) to $530 a share, up from $400, while maintaining a buy rating on the stock. The analysts cited accelerating demand for generative artificial intelligence.

7. KeyBanc on Monday, in a call I love, raised its price target on Airbnb (ABNB) to $160 a share, from $135, on the back of reaccelerating travel spending. The firm reiterated an overweight, or buy, rating on Airbnb stock.

8. Mizuho on Monday raised its price target on Intel (INTC) to $33 a share, from $30, arguing semiconductor group multiples have improved. The firm maintained a neutral rating on the stock.

9. Raymond James on Monday upgraded home-construction company DR Horton (DHI) to outperform, or buy, from market perform on the back its “outstanding” fiscal third-quarter results. The firm, which has a price target of $160 on DHI shares, noted an “impressive rebound” in homebuilding margins.

10. Wells Fargo on Monday downgraded its rating on Interpublic Group (IPG) to equal weight, or neutral, from overweight, ahead of a late-cycle downturn. The firm lowered its price target on IPG to $33 a share, from $43.

(See here for a full list of the stocks in Jim Cramer’s Charitable Trust.)

As a subscriber to the CNBC Investing Club with Jim Cramer, you will receive a trade alert before Jim makes a trade. Jim waits 45 minutes after sending a trade alert before buying or selling a stock in his charitable trust’s portfolio. If Jim has talked about a stock on CNBC TV, he waits 72 hours after issuing the trade alert before executing the trade.

THE ABOVE INVESTING CLUB INFORMATION IS SUBJECT TO OUR TERMS AND CONDITIONS AND PRIVACY POLICY, TOGETHER WITH OUR DISCLAIMER.  NO FIDUCIARY OBLIGATION OR DUTY EXISTS, OR IS CREATED, BY VIRTUE OF YOUR RECEIPT OF ANY INFORMATION PROVIDED IN CONNECTION WITH THE INVESTING CLUB.  NO SPECIFIC OUTCOME OR PROFIT IS GUARANTEED.

Source link

#Jim #Cramers #top #watch #stock #market #Monday

Jim Cramer’s top 10 things to watch in the stock market Tuesday

My top 10 things to watch Tuesday, May 2

1. DuPont (DD) delivers a first-quarter earnings beat Tuesday, with adjusted earnings-per-share (EPS) of 84 cents, compared with analysts’ forecasts of 80 cents per share. But the materials giant cut its full-year revenue forecast, sending shares nearly 5% lower in premarket trading. DuPont also says it’s agreed to buy Spectrum Plastics Group from AEA Investors for $1.75 billion, in a deal that should be immediately accretive.

2. Club holding Morgan Stanley (MS) is planning to cut 3,000 jobs in the bank’s second round of layoffs in six months, Reuters reported Monday.

3. Tesla (TSLA) raises prices on some models of its electric vehicles in the U.S., China, Japan and Canada. The news come after several rounds of price cuts earlier this year.

4. Citi calls SoFi Technologies‘ (SOFI) post-earnings sell-off “unwarranted,” while reiterating a buy rating and $10-per-share price target. Meanwhile, Wedbush downgrades SOFI to neutral from outperform and lowers its price target to $5 per share, from $8.

5. TD Cowen raises its price target on health insurer Humana (HUM) to $616 per share, from $581, while reiterating an outperform rating. The Club holding last week delivered a first-quarter earnings beat and raised its guidance.

6. Uber Technologies (UBER) reports a first-quarter revenue beat of $8.82 billion, ahead of analysts’ forecasts for $8.72 billion, sending the stock soaring by nearly 10% in premarket trading. The company reports an EPS loss of 8 cents, compared with expectations for a 9 cent-per-share loss, while guiding for gross bookings of $33 billion to $34 billion in the second quarter.

7. BP reports stronger-than-expected first-quarter profits on Tuesday, with its underlying replacement cost profit coming in at $4.96 billion on the back of strong oil-and-gas trading. The British oil major expects to deliver share buybacks totaling $4 billion for the year, at the lower end of its capital expenditure range of $14 billion to $18 billion. Shares of BP were down roughly 5% in premarket trading.

8. Morgan Stanley raises its price target on Exxon Mobil (XOM) to $122 per share, from $118, while reiterating an overweight rating on the stock. The bank cites the U.S. oil major’s record first-quarter profit, which it reported last Friday.

9. Bank of America raises its price target on Brinker International (EAT) to $33 per share, from $29, reflecting a higher market multiple. But the firm maintains its underperform, or sell, rating on EAT stock.

10. The CEO of International Business Machines Corp. (IBM), Arvind Krishna, said the company plans to pause hiring for back-office roles that could be replaced by artificial intelligence (AI) in the coming years. “I could easily see 30% [roughly 7,800 jobs] of that getting replaced by AI and automation over a five-year period,” Krishna told Bloomberg.

(See here for a full list of the stocks in Jim Cramer’s Charitable Trust.)

As a subscriber to the CNBC Investing Club with Jim Cramer, you will receive a trade alert before Jim makes a trade. Jim waits 45 minutes after sending a trade alert before buying or selling a stock in his charitable trust’s portfolio. If Jim has talked about a stock on CNBC TV, he waits 72 hours after issuing the trade alert before executing the trade.

THE ABOVE INVESTING CLUB INFORMATION IS SUBJECT TO OUR TERMS AND CONDITIONS AND PRIVACY POLICY, TOGETHER WITH OUR DISCLAIMER.  NO FIDUCIARY OBLIGATION OR DUTY EXISTS, OR IS CREATED, BY VIRTUE OF YOUR RECEIPT OF ANY INFORMATION PROVIDED IN CONNECTION WITH THE INVESTING CLUB.  NO SPECIFIC OUTCOME OR PROFIT IS GUARANTEED.

Source link

#Jim #Cramers #top #watch #stock #market #Tuesday

Stocks making the biggest moves premarket: United Airlines, Netflix, Morgan Stanley and more

Check out the companies making headlines before the bell.

United Airlines — The airline lost 0.9% in the premarket after it announced a net loss for the first quarter. United posted a loss of 63 cents per share, which is 10 cents smaller than the 73-cent estimated loss from analysts polled by Refinitiv. The company reported $11.43 billion in revenue, slightly above the $11.42 billion estimated. 

Interactive Brokers Group — Shares of the electronic broker were down 3.7% after the company reported a miss on earnings in the first quarter. The company posted earnings per share of $1.35, which fell below the $1.41 consensus estimate from analysts polled by Refinitiv.

Netflix – Shares of the streaming giant fell more than 2% after the company reported mixed results on the delayed rollout of its crackdown on password-sharing, which was originally scheduled for the first quarter. Revenue came in slightly below the analyst consensus from Refinitiv, although earnings topped estimates.

Western Alliance – Shares of the beaten-down regional bank jumped more than 20% in premarket trading after Western Alliance said its deposits have been rebounding in April after declining 11% in the first quarter. Wedbush upgraded the stock to outperform after Western Alliance’s quarterly report despite the bank’s net income falling more than 50% from the previous quarter.

Travelers — The insurance stock added more than 3% before the bell after beating Wall Street’s expectations on both the top and bottom lines. The Dow Jones Industrial Average component reported adjusted earnings of $4.11 a share on $9.40 billion in net premiums.

Intel — Shares were down almost 2% after the semiconductor manufacturer announced it would be discontinuing its bitcoin mining chip series, Blockscale, after just a year of production. 

Abbott Laboratories — The medical device company advanced 2.8% after beating top- and bottom-line expectations and reaffirming guidance. The company reported $1.03 in earnings per share on revenue of $9.75 billion for the first quarter, while analysts polled by FactSet anticipated 99 cents in per-share earnings on $9.67 billion in revenue. The company said it still expects full-year adjusted earnings per share to come in between $4.30 and $4.50, in line with the $4.39 consensus estimate of analysts. 

U.S. Bancorp — Shares of the bank were up 1.7% after it announced an earnings and revenue beat for the first quarter. U.S. Bancorp posted $1.16 earnings per share and revenue of $7.18 billion. Analysts polled by Refinitiv had estimated per-share earnings of $1.12 and revenue of $7.12 billion. Meanwhile, the bank reported its quarter-end deposits were down 3.7% to $505.3 billion. 

Rivian Automotive — The electric-vehicle maker slipped about 2% after being downgraded by RBC Capital Markets to sector perform from outperform. The Wall Street firm remains constructive on the longer-term outlook for the stock, but sees limited catalysts to accelerate profitability in the near term. It also slashed its price target in half, to $14 from $28 per share.

ASML Holding – Shares of the chipmaker lost 2.6% in early morning trading after the company reported net bookings for the first quarter were down 46% year-over-year on “mixed signals” from customers as they work through inventory. The shares fell despite ASML reporting an earnings beat for the quarter.

Boeing — Shares of the industial rgiant dipped 0.6% in premarket after CEO Dave Calhoun said that a flaw detected in some of its 737 Max planes won’t hinder its supply chain plans for increased production of its bestselling jetliner this year. The company disclosed a flaw with some of its 737 Max planes last week and said it was likely to delay deliveries.

Morgan Stanley  — Shares were down 3.2% after the bank announced its quarterly earnings. The investment bank and wealth manager posted earnings per share of $1.70 for the first quarter, greater than the $1.62 estimate from analysts polled by Refinitiv. Overall revenue came in at $14.52 billion, above the $13.92 billion consensus estimate from Refinitiv as equities and fixed income trading units performed better than expected. One growth area was wealth management, where revenue increased by 11% from a year ago. The shares, which are outperforming most other banks this year, eased by 2% in early trading despite the results.

Ally Financial — The digital financial services company’s shares were down 1.3% after its first quarter earnings and revenue missed Wall Street’s expectations. Ally posted per-share earnings of 82 cents, while analysts had anticipated 86 cents per share, according to FactSet data. The bank’s adjusted total net revenue also fell below estimates, coming in at $2.05 billion versus the $2.07 billion consensus estimate from FactSet analysts.  

Intuitive Surgical — Shares jumped 8.1% after Intuitive Surgical reported an earnings and revenue beat. The company reported adjusted earnings per share of $1.23, topping against a consensus estimate of $1.20 per share, according to FactSet. Revenue grew 14% from the prior year, coming in at $1.70 billion, compared to estimates of $1.59 billion.

Tesla – Shares dropped more than 2% in the premarket after Tesla slashed prices on some of its Model Y and Model 3 electric vehicles in the U.S. The cuts come ahead of Tesla’s earnings report after the bell on Wednesday and is the sixth time the EV maker has lowered prices in the U.S. this year.

 Zions Bancorporation — The regional bank stock jumped nearly 4% in premarket before its earnings report after the bell Wednesday. Investors could be getting optimistic after its peer Western Alliance said in its first-quarter that deposits have stabilized since last month’s collapse of Silicon Valley Bank.

CDW — The IT company’s shares plunged 10.6% after it reported a weaker-than-expected preliminary quarterly earnings report. CDW issued quarterly revenue guidance of $5.1 billion, falling below the FactSet analysts’ consensus estimate of $5.58 billion. The company said it was significantly impacted by more cautious buying amid economic uncertainty. It also issued guidance for its full-year earnings to fall “modestly below” 2022 levels.

Citizens Financial Group — Shares were down almost 4% after the company’s first-quarter earnings disappointed investors. Citizens Financial’s earnings per share came in at $1, while analysts had estimated $1.13, according to Refinitiv data. The company’s revenue of $2.13 billion also came below analysts’ expectations of $2.14 billion. Citizens Financial reported a 4.7% decline in deposits to $172.2 billion.

— CNBC’s Alex Harring, Tanaya Macheel, John Melloy, Michelle Fox, Yun Li, Jesse Pound and Kristina Partsinevelos contributed reporting

Source link

#Stocks #making #biggest #moves #premarket #United #Airlines #Netflix #Morgan #Stanley

Jim Cramer’s top 10 things to watch in the stock market Tuesday

My top 10 things to watch Tuesday, April 11

1. Truist Bank downgraded natural gas producer EQT Corporation (EQT) to hold from buy, while lowering its price target to $28 per share, from $41, on “potentially lower volumes.” Meanwhile, the bank raised its price target on Club holding Coterra Energy (CTRA) to $29 per share, from $26, on the expectation the oil-and-gas producer will “significantly outperform” the broader market in the second half of the year and in 2024. Truist maintained a hold rating on Coterra.

2. Barclays cut its price target on Club holding Constellation Brands (STZ) to $277 per share, from $279, while maintaining an overweight rating. The move is somewhat meaningless given how far the target is from where the stock is, with shares of STZ closing at $224.60 apiece on Monday. The bank also lowered its price target on Lincoln National (LNC) to $20 per-share, from $29, while maintaining an equal weight rating.

3. JPMorgan is positive on Netflix (NFLX) going into its first-quarter earnings, but sees a risk to the second quarter due to its new paid-sharing policy. The bank maintained a price target of $390 per share, along with an overweight rating.

4. Wells Fargo upgraded natural gas exploration-and-production group Range Resources (RRC) to overweight from equal weight, while raising its price target to $31 per share, from $30. The bank expects RRC to “relatively outperform” other gas players in a weak gas price environment. Meanwhile, the bank downgraded Southwestern Energy (SWN) to underweight, or sell, from equal weight, while lowering its price target to $5 per share, from $6 — largely a result of limited capital returns and weak cash flow generation.

5. Guggenheim lowered its price target on Club holding Walt Disney (DIS) to $130 a share, from $140, on the back of moderating growth at its parks and resorts — a target that is very far off. Shares of Disney closed at $100.81 apiece on Monday.

6. Citi reiterated neutral ratings on chipmakers Intel (INTC) and Club holding Advanced Micro Devices (AMD), a result of ongoing weak cloud demand. Still, computer notebook shipments were up 41% in March, month-over-month, 18% above Citi’s estimate.

7. KeyBanc raised its price target on Club holding Nvidia (NVDA) to $320 per share, from $280, citing strengthening demand for artificial intelligence (AI).The semiconductor firm’s graphics processing units (GPUs) have proven central to the proliferation of AI, which reached a tipping point late last year with the launch of OpenAI’s viral chatbot, ChatGPT.

8. Morgan Stanley raised its price target on Club holding Humana (HUM) to $637 per share, from $620, saying the health insurer has “the strongest earnings growth story in managed care through 2025.” The bank maintained an overweight, or buy, rating on the stock. But Morgan Stanley chose UnitedHealth (UNH) as its top pick in the sector, replacing Cigna (CI).

9. UBS lowered its growth estimates on Club holding Microsoft‘s (MSFT) Azure cloud business, suggesting customers will continue to cut back on cloud spending amid slower economic growth. The bank maintained a neutral rating and price target of $275 per share.

10. Despite recent price cuts, electric vehicle maker Tesla (TSLA) should be able to maintain “industry leading” operating margins and is better positioned than competitors to navigate economic headwinds, Baird argued. The firm maintained an outperform, or buy, rating and price target of $252 per share.

(See here for a full list of the stocks in Jim Cramer’s Charitable Trust.)

As a subscriber to the CNBC Investing Club with Jim Cramer, you will receive a trade alert before Jim makes a trade. Jim waits 45 minutes after sending a trade alert before buying or selling a stock in his charitable trust’s portfolio. If Jim has talked about a stock on CNBC TV, he waits 72 hours after issuing the trade alert before executing the trade.

THE ABOVE INVESTING CLUB INFORMATION IS SUBJECT TO OUR TERMS AND CONDITIONS AND PRIVACY POLICY, TOGETHER WITH OUR DISCLAIMER.  NO FIDUCIARY OBLIGATION OR DUTY EXISTS, OR IS CREATED, BY VIRTUE OF YOUR RECEIPT OF ANY INFORMATION PROVIDED IN CONNECTION WITH THE INVESTING CLUB.  NO SPECIFIC OUTCOME OR PROFIT IS GUARANTEED.

Source link

#Jim #Cramers #top #watch #stock #market #Tuesday