We can tackle climate change, jobs, growth and global trade. Here’s what’s stopping us

We must leave behind established modes of thinking and seek creative workable solutions.

Another tumultuous year has confirmed that the global economy is at a turning point. We face four big challenges: the climate transition; the good-jobs problem; an economic-development crisis, and the search for a newer, healthier form of globalization.

To address each, we must leave behind established modes of thinking and seek creative workable solutions, while recognizing that these efforts will be necessarily uncoordinated and experimental.

Climate change is the most daunting challenge, and the one that has been overlooked the longest — at great cost. If we are to avoid condemning humanity to a dystopian future, we must act fast to decarbonize the global economy. We have long known that we must wean ourselves from fossil fuels, develop green alternatives and shore up our defenses against the lasting environmental damage that past inaction has already caused. However, it has become clear that little of this is likely to be achieved through global cooperation or economists’ favored policies.

Instead, individual countries will forge ahead with their own green agendas, implementing policies that best account for their specific political constraints, as the United States, China and the European Union have been doing. The result will be a hodge-podge of emission caps, tax incentives, research and development support, and green industrial policies with little global coherence and occasional costs for other countries. Messy though it may be, an uncoordinated push for climate action may be the best we can realistically hope for.

Inequality, the erosion of the middle class, and labor-market polarization have caused significant damage to our social environment.

But our physical environment is not the only threat we face. Inequality, the erosion of the middle class, and labor-market polarization have caused equally significant damage to our social environment. The consequences are now widely evident. Economic, regional, and cultural gaps within countries are widening, and liberal democracy (and the values that support it) appears to be in decline, reflecting rising support for xenophobic, authoritarian populists and the growing backlash against scientific and technical expertise.

Social transfers and the welfare state can help, but what is most needed is an increase in the supply of good jobs for the less-educated workers who have lost access to them. We need more productive, well-remunerated employment opportunities that can provide dignity and social recognition for those without a college degree. Expanding the supply of such jobs will require not only more investment in education and more robust defense of workers’ rights, but also a new brand of industrial policies for services, where the bulk of future employment will be created.

The disappearance of manufacturing jobs over time reflects both greater automation and stronger global competition. Developing countries have not been immune to either factor. Many have experienced “premature de-industrialization”: their absorption of workers into formal, productive manufacturing firms is now very limited, which means they are precluded from pursuing the kind of export-oriented development strategy that has been so effective in East Asia and a few other countries. Together with the climate challenge, this crisis of growth strategies in low-income countries calls for an entirely new development model.

Governments will have to experiment, combining investment in the green transition with productivity enhancements in labor-absorbing services.

As in the advanced economies, services will be low- and middle-income countries’ main source of employment creation. But most services in these economies are dominated by very small, informal enterprises — often sole proprietorships — and there are essentially no ready-made models of service-led development to emulate. Governments will have to experiment, combining investment in the green transition with productivity enhancements in labor-absorbing services.

Finally, globalization itself must be reinvented. The post-1990 hyper-globalization model has been overtaken by the rise of U.S.-China geopolitical competition, and by the higher priority placed on domestic social, economic, public-health, and environmental concerns. No longer fit for purpose, globalization as we know it will have to be replaced by a new understanding that rebalances national needs and the requirements of a healthy global economy that facilitates international trade and long-term foreign investment.

Most likely, the new globalization model will be less intrusive, acknowledging the needs of all countries (not just major powers) that want greater policy flexibility to address domestic challenges and national-security imperatives. One possibility is that the U.S. or China will take an overly expansive view of its security needs, seeking global primacy (in the U.S. case) or regional domination (China). The result would be a “weaponization” of economic interdependence and significant economic decoupling, with trade and investment treated as a zero-sum game.

The biggest gift major powers can give to the world economy is to manage their own domestic economies well.

But there could also be a more favorable scenario in which both powers keep their geopolitical ambitions in check, recognizing that their competing economic goals are better served through accommodation and cooperation. This scenario might serve the global economy well, even if — or perhaps because — it falls short of hyper-globalization. As the Bretton Woods era showed, a significant expansion of global trade and investment is compatible with a thin model of globalization, wherein countries retain considerable policy autonomy with which to foster social cohesion and economic growth at home. The biggest gift major powers can give to the world economy is to manage their own domestic economies well.

All these challenges call for new ideas and frameworks. We do not need to throw conventional economics out the window. But to remain relevant, economists must learn to apply the tools of their trade to the objectives and constraints of the day. They will have to be open to experimentation, and sympathetic if governments engage in actions that do not conform to the playbooks of the past.

Dani Rodrik, professor of international political economy at Harvard Kennedy School, is president of the International Economic Association and the author of Straight Talk on Trade: Ideas for a Sane World Economy (Princeton University Press, 2017).

This commentary was published with the permission of Project Syndicate — Confronting Our Four Biggest Economic Challenges

More: Biden administration’s antitrust victories are much-needed wins for consumers

Also read: ‘Dr. Doom’ Nouriel Roubini: ‘Worst-case scenarios appear to be the least likely.’ For now.

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A gloomy mood hangs over Ukraine’s soldiers as war with Russia grinds on

A gloomy mood hangs over Ukraine’s soldiers nearly two years after Russia invaded their country.

Despite a disappointing counteroffensive this summer and signs of wavering financial support from allies, Ukrainian soldiers say they remain fiercely determined to win. But as winter approaches, they worry that Russia is better equipped for battle and are frustrated about being on the defensive again in a grueling war. Some doubt the judgment of their leaders.

Discontent among Ukrainian soldiers — once extremely rare and expressed only in private — is now more common and out in the open.

In the southern city of Kherson, where Ukraine is staging attacks against well-armed Russian troops on the other side of the Dnieper River, soldiers are asking why these difficult amphibious operations were not launched months ago in warmer weather.

“I don’t understand,” said a commander of the 11th National Guard Brigade’s anti-drone unit who is known on the battlefield as Boxer. “Now it’s harder and colder.”

“It’s not just my feeling, many units share it,” said Boxer, who spoke on condition that only his battlefield name would be used.

Russia, which illegally annexed the Crimean Peninsula in 2014, controls about one-fifth of Ukraine. After 22 months of war the two countries are essentially in a stalemate along the 1,000 kilometre-longf front line.

Russian Forces aim to push deeper into eastern Ukraine this winter, analysts say, so that Russian President Vladimir Putin can cite this momentum as he campaigns for reelection, an outcome that is all but certain. Emboldened by recent gains on the battlefield, Putin said last week that he remains fully committed to the war and criticized Ukraine for “sacrificing” troops to demonstrate success to Western sponsors.

In the United States, which has already spent some $111 billion defending Ukraine, President Joe Biden is advocating for an additional $50 billion in aid. But Republican lawmakers are balking at more support — just as some lawmakers in Europe are on the fence about providing another $50 billion to Ukraine, after failing to deliver on promised ammunition.

“The reason the Ukrainians are gloomy is that, they now sense, not only have they not done well this year … they know that the Russians’ game is improving,” said Richard Barrons, a former British Army General. “They see what’s happening in Congress, and they see what happened in the EU.”

Ukraine may be on the defensive this winter, but its military leaders say they have no intention of letting up the fight.

“If we won’t have a single bullet, we will kill them with shovels,” said Serhii, a Commander in the 59th Brigade that is active in the eastern city of Avdiivka and who spoke on condition that only his first name be used. “Surely, everyone is tired of war, physically and mentally. But imagine if we stop — what happens next?”

The fatigue and frustration on the battlefield are mirrored in Ukraine’s capital, Kyiv, where disagreements among leaders have recently spilled out into the open.

President Volodymyr Zelenskyy last month publicly disputed the assessment by Ukraine’s Military Chief, Valery Zaluzhny, that the war had reached a stalemate. And the Mayor of Kyiv, Vitali Klitschko, has repeatedly lashed out at Mr. Zelenskyy, saying he holds too much power.

Disquiet in the halls of power appears to have filtered down to the Military’s rank and file, who increasingly have misgivings about inefficiency and faulty decision-making within the bureaucracy they depend on to keep them well-armed for the fight.

In the southern Ukrainian region of Zaporizhzhia, where momentum has slowed since the summertime counteroffensive, drones have become a crucial tool of war. They enable soldiers to keep an eye on — and hold back — Russian forces while they conduct dangerous and painstaking operations to clear minefields and consolidate territorial gains. But fighters there complain that the military has been too slow in training drone operators.

It took seven months to obtain the paperwork needed from multiple government agencies to train 75 men, said Konstantin Denisov, a Ukrainian soldier.

“We wasted time for nothing,” he said. Commanders elsewhere complain of not enough troops, or delays in getting drones repaired, disrupting combat missions.

Defense Minister Rustem Umerov insists Ukraine has enough soldiers and weaponry to power the next phase of the fight.

Ukrainian Defense Minister Rustem Umerov rides in an APC during a visit to the front-line city of Kupiansk, Kharkiv region, Ukraine, on Nov. 30, 2023.
| Photo Credit:
AP

“We are capable and able to protect our people and we will be doing it,” he told the Associated Press. “We have a plan and we are sticking to that plan.”

The limited momentum Ukraine’s forces had during their summertime counteroffensive has slowed — from the forests in the northeast, to the urban centers in the east, to the slushy farmland in the South.

With Russia hoping to take the initiative this winter, Ukraine is mainly focused on standing its ground, according to interviews with a half dozen military commanders along the vast front line.

Despite wet, muddy ground that makes it harder to move tanks and other heavy weaponry around, the Russian army has bolstered its forces in the eastern Donetsk region, where it has recently stepped up offensive maneuvers.

“The main goal for the winter is to lose as few people as possible,” said Parker, the Ukrainian Commander of a Mechanized Battalion near Bakhmut who asked to go by his battlefield name to speak freely. Bakhmut is a city in eastern Ukraine that Russian forces took after months of heavy fighting.

“We have to be clear,” Mr. Parker said. “It’s not possible in the winter to liberate Donetsk or Bakhmut, because they have too many (fighters).”

Analysts say Ukraine may even be forced to cede patches of previously reclaimed territory this winter, though Russia is likely to pay a heavy price.

“If Russia keeps on attacking, the most likely outcome is that they’ll make some very marginal territorial gains, but suffer enormous casualties in doing so,” said Ben Barry, a senior fellow at the International Institute for Strategic Studies in London.

Some Ukrainian commanders across the front line say they lack the fighters and firepower needed to keep Russia’s seemingly endless waves of infantrymen at arm’s length as they fortify defenses to protect soldiers. That places ever more importance on attack drones — a weapon, they say, that Russia is currently better equipped with.

 In this photo provided by the Ukrainian 10th Mountain Assault Brigade “Edelweiss”, Ukrainian soldiers pass by a volunteer bus burning after a Russian drone hit it near Bakhmut, Donetsk region, Ukraine, Thursday, Nov. 23, 2023. A gloomy mood hangs over Ukraine’s soldiers nearly two years after Russia invaded their country. Ukrainian soldiers remain fiercely determined to win, despite a disappointing counteroffensive this summer and signs of wavering financial support from allies.

In this photo provided by the Ukrainian 10th Mountain Assault Brigade “Edelweiss”, Ukrainian soldiers pass by a volunteer bus burning after a Russian drone hit it near Bakhmut, Donetsk region, Ukraine, Thursday, Nov. 23, 2023. A gloomy mood hangs over Ukraine’s soldiers nearly two years after Russia invaded their country. Ukrainian soldiers remain fiercely determined to win, despite a disappointing counteroffensive this summer and signs of wavering financial support from allies.
| Photo Credit:
AP

Indeed, while Ukrainian soldiers have proven to be resourceful and innovative on the battlefield, Moscow has dramatically scaled up its Defense Industry in the past year, manufacturing armored vehicles and artillery rounds at a pace Ukraine cannot match.

“Yes they’re ahead of us in terms of supply,” said Boxer, the Commander in Kherson, who credited Russian drones with having longer range and more advanced software. “It allows the drone to go up 2,000 meters, avoid jammers,” he said, whereas Ukrainian drones “can fly only 500 meters.”

This poses a problem for his troops, who have been limited in their ability to strike Russian targets on the other side of the Dnieper River. To eventually deploy heavy weaponry, such as tanks, Ukraine first needs to push Russian forces back to erect pontoon bridges. Until they get more drones, this won’t be possible, said Boxer.

“We wait for weapons we were supposed to receive months ago,” he said.

A woman stands with a tape on her mouth reading “Do not be silent” during a rally of relatives and friends of Ukrainian military prisoners of war, specifically captives from the defence of Mariupol dubbed “Azovstal defenders”, hold placards during a rally calling for their quick exchange with Russian prisoners of war, at Saint Sophia Square in Kyiv, on December 17, 2023, amid the Russian invasion in Ukraine.

A woman stands with a tape on her mouth reading “Do not be silent” during a rally of relatives and friends of Ukrainian military prisoners of war, specifically captives from the defence of Mariupol dubbed “Azovstal defenders”, hold placards during a rally calling for their quick exchange with Russian prisoners of war, at Saint Sophia Square in Kyiv, on December 17, 2023, amid the Russian invasion in Ukraine.
| Photo Credit:
AFP

To sustain the fight, Ukraine will also have to mobilize more men.

In the Northeastern cities of Kupiansk and Lyman, Russian forces have deployed a large force with the goal of recapturing lost territory.

“They are simply weakening our positions and strongholds, injuring our soldiers, thereby forcing them to leave the battlefield,” said Dolphin, a Commander in the northeast who would only be quoted using his battlefield name.

Mr. Dolphin says he has been unable to sufficiently re-staff. “I can say for my unit, we are prepared 60%,” he said.

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US Preparing For Possible Mass Evacuation If Israel-Hamas War Escalates: Report

Israel is preparing for a ground offensive against Hamas.

Washington:

The Joe Biden administration in the United States is preparing for the possibility of carrying out a mass evacuation of hundreds of thousands of American citizens from the Middle East if the ongoing conflict in Gaza isn’t contained, the Washington Post reported citing officials.

This comes as Israeli forces, aided by US weapons and military advisers, prepare for a ground offensive against Hamas terrorists responsible for the horrific cross-border attack on October 7 that killed over 1400 people.

The officials, speaking on the condition of anonymity to detail internal deliberations, said Americans living in Israel and neighbouring Lebanon are of particular concern, though they stressed that an evacuation of that magnitude is considered a worst-case scenario and that other outcomes are seen as more likely, Washington Post reported.

Still, one official said, it “would be irresponsible not to have a plan for everything.”

The US administration, despite its public support for Israel, is deeply alarmed by the prospect of escalation, and in recent days it has turned its attention in part to the complicated logistics of abruptly having to relocate a large number of people, according to three people familiar with the discussions, as per Washington Post.

There were about 6,00,000 US citizens in Israel and another 86,000 are believed to be in Lebanon when Hamas attacked, according to State Department estimates.

The concern in Lebanon is chiefly over the terror group Hezbollah, which, along with allies, currently controls the largest number of parliamentary seats. It entered parliament in 1992. It has long accepted training and weapons from Iran, prompting concerns that it could attack Israel from the north, creating a two-front war that would stretch Israeli forces. Already, there have been skirmishes along their shared border, the Washington Post reported.

“This has become a real issue,” one official said. “The administration is very, very, very worried that this thing is going to get out of hand.”

The administration’s concern extends beyond those two countries, as officials watch the street protests that have spread across the Arab world, putting both US personnel and citizens in the region at heightened risk.

The bombardment of Gaza has inflamed regional fury at Israel and its treatment of Palestinians — an issue some officials believed no longer carried as much importance in the Arab world.

“The street to a large extent is now in charge,” said Bruce Riedel, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and former official in the Clinton administration.

“We were told for the last 10 years that the Arab world and Muslim world didn’t care about Palestine anymore, and Abraham Accords were proof of that,” Riedel added, referring to agreements, signed by the governments of Sudan, Morocco, Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates, aimed at normalizing relations with Israel.

“Well, Palestine has come back. I don’t think it ever went away,” Washington Post quoted him as saying.

Meanwhile, more than 5,000 people in Gaza, mostly civilians and children, have been killed amid unrelenting Israeli airstrikes since the October 7 attacks, Palestinian health officials say.

Last week, the State Department issued an advisory to all US citizens worldwide “to exercise increased caution” due to “increased tensions in various locations around the world, the potential for terrorist attacks, [and] demonstrations or violent actions against US citizens and interests”, the Washington Post reported.

The warning was in response to demonstrations that have erupted in response to the Israel-Hamas conflict and broader anger in the Arab world over Washington’s full political, economic and military backing of Israel.

Many experts warn that depending on the scale of a potential US evacuation, it could be more difficult than any previous operations in recent memory. It could involve Air Force aircraft or Navy warships, which have surged to the region this month.

“With 600,000 Americans in Israel and threats to other Americans across the region, it’s hard to think of an evacuation that might compare to this in scale, scope and complexity,” said Suzanne Maloney, the director of foreign policy at the Brookings Institution.

“The sort of advisories the State Department has put out lately have been fairly blunt,” Washington Post quoted her as saying.

On Monday, the Pentagon also signalled that it is bracing for a significant increase in attacks on US troops in the Middle East, and the department singled out Iran for its extensive sponsorship of groups with a long history of using rockets and drones to target American military positions. In response, Pentagon officials said, they are surging additional missile-defense systems to the region.

Brig. Gen. Patrick Ryder, a Pentagon spokesman, told reporters that a “broader escalation” is possible “in the days ahead.” Senior military leaders, he said, are taking “all necessary measures” to safeguard US personnel.

Particularly vulnerable are the estimated 3,400 troops deployed in Iraq and Syria, where earlier in the day US personnel based near the Jordan border intercepted at least two one-way attack drones, the Washington Post reported citing officials.

“We don’t necessarily see that Iran has explicitly ordered them to take these kinds of attacks,” Ryder said. “That said, by virtue of the fact that they are supported by Iran, we will ultimately hold Iran responsible.”

It’s unclear how many times deployed personnel have come under fire since the Israel-Hamas crisis began October 7.

The Post reported citing officials said that the Pentagon was compiling a list of confirmed incidents but that the effort had been hampered by what one senior defense official called the profusion of “disinformation and misinformation.”

Meanwhile, no US personnel are known to have been killed or seriously injured in any of the spillover violence. An American contractor in Iraq did suffer a fatal heart attack last week as troops and others at the Ain al-Asad air base raced to take cover from what proved to be a false alarm of an incoming attack, Washington Post reported.

(Except for the headline, this story has not been edited by NDTV staff and is published from a syndicated feed.)

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AIG Women’s Open: Charley Hull looks to replicate Georgia Hall with major victory on home soil

All four women’s major so far in 2023 have produced maiden major champions; Charley Hull among the hope hopes as she looks to win the AIG Women’s Open, five years on from Georgia Hall’s success; watch live on Thursday from 11am on Sky Sports Golf

Last Updated: 08/08/23 5:35pm


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Britain’s Charley Hull is hoping home advantage can help her secure her first major as she prepares for the Women’s Open at Walton Heath

Britain’s Charley Hull is hoping home advantage can help her secure her first major as she prepares for the Women’s Open at Walton Heath

Charley Hull hopes to take inspiration from close friend Georgia Hall and extend the run of first-time major winners this week at the AIG Women’s Open.

Hull finished runner-up at the Tournament of Champions in January and threatened a major breakthrough at the US Women’s Open last month, finishing tied-second behind Allisen Corpuz, then claimed second at the Aramco Team Series event at the Centurion Club in her next start.

The 27-year-old heads to Walton Heath having missed the cut in three of the four majors this year and never finished higher than 12th in her previous 11 AIG Women’s Open appearances, although hopes to match Hall’s 2018 success and enjoy victory on home soil.

The final major of the season in women's golf major season gets under way at Walton Heath on August 10 - you can catch all of the action live on Sky Sports.

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The final major of the season in women’s golf major season gets under way at Walton Heath on August 10 – you can catch all of the action live on Sky Sports.

The final major of the season in women’s golf major season gets under way at Walton Heath on August 10 – you can catch all of the action live on Sky Sports.

“I finished second the week after the US Women’s Open and it gives me a bit of confidence,” Hull told Sky Sports ahead of the final women’s major of the year. “I feel good.

“I feel in a good mindset and I know what it takes to win events. It would be great to win on home soil, just like Georgia (Hall) did a few years ago. You’ve got to be aggressive to win any tournament I think, certainly for me anyway. I enjoy playing that way and I find it fun.

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“It’s really special, especially when it’s in England! We don’t play enough tournaments at home and I’m so much a home person. I love being at home – it makes me happy. I’m looking forward to having my friends and family down there.”

Hall relishing Boutier pairing at Walton Heath

Hall will play alongside Solheim Cup team-mate Celine Boutier for the first two rounds, who is chasing her third consecutive LPGA Tour victory after following a maiden major title on home soil at the Evian Championship by winning the Women’s Scottish Open on Sunday.

Georgia Hall is hoping to triumph once again at the AIG Women's Open, having secured her only major back in 2018 at the tournament

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Georgia Hall is hoping to triumph once again at the AIG Women’s Open, having secured her only major back in 2018 at the tournament

Georgia Hall is hoping to triumph once again at the AIG Women’s Open, having secured her only major back in 2018 at the tournament

“I have been in contention a couple of times after winning in 2018 and it gave me a bit of a boost coming down the stretch,” Hall told Sky Sports. “Hopefully I can be in a good position come the weekend but I am just going to look forward to my tee shot on Thursday first.

“I played with Celine (Boutier) quite a lot this year already and I know her quite well from being partners in Solheim. We have been partners in the Solheim for the past two and I am just really pleased for her winning the last two (events).

In-form Celine Boutier says she is looking to maintain her winning streak with victory at the Women's Open at Walton Heath this week

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In-form Celine Boutier says she is looking to maintain her winning streak with victory at the Women’s Open at Walton Heath this week

In-form Celine Boutier says she is looking to maintain her winning streak with victory at the Women’s Open at Walton Heath this week

“Winning in your home country, I know what that feels like and she is such a lovely person, we will have a lot of fun out there. Mentally it is very tiring, especially being on top of the leaderboard and winning two in a row.

“I don’t know what that feels like but I bet she has got a lot of confidence going into this week and she strikes the ball well so it will be a good couple of days with her.”

Enjoy live action from the Premier League, EFL, Scottish Premiership and moreBurnley v Man City – August 11 – LIVE on Sky Sports Premier League
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The Hundred – August 1 to 27 – LIVE on Sky Sports Cricket
Women’s Open – August 10 to 13 – LIVE on Sky Sports Golf
FedEx St Jude Championship – August 10 to 13 – LIVE on Sky Sports Golf

A British winner at Walton Heath?

Hall became just the fourth Englishwoman in history to win a major, following on from Karen Stupples, Alison Nicholas and Dame Laura Davies, while Catriona Matthew – the only other British female major champion after the Scot won the 2009 contest – is back several of the British contingent to impress.

Former AIG Women's Open champion Catriona Matthew believes it will be difficult for Celine Boutier to win three events in a row

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Former AIG Women’s Open champion Catriona Matthew believes it will be difficult for Celine Boutier to win three events in a row

Former AIG Women’s Open champion Catriona Matthew believes it will be difficult for Celine Boutier to win three events in a row

“Obviously Charley (Hull) grew up playing this kind of golf down here and had a great US Women’s Open, so I think she will be looking to have a good week,” Matthew told Sky Sports. “Then Georgia, she has been playing well on and off this year, and is a previous winner as well.

“There is a lot of home talent. Gemma Dryburgh of course from Scotland is the Scottish hope that has been coming into some form again this year, so some good ones to look for.”

Can Gemma Dryburgh secure a Solheim Cup debut with a strong performance this week?

Can Gemma Dryburgh secure a Solheim Cup debut with a strong performance this week?

On whether Dryburgh can force her way into Solheim Cup consideration with a strong performance, Matthew added. “I think even if they sat it is not [on their minds], I am sure it will be there in the back it.

Gemma knows that if she can just have a good result here, that would hopefully just sew up her potentially pick or get her in the reckoning with Suzann (Pettersen). As much as you say you’re not thinking about it, it is always there lurking in the back of your mind especially with only a couple of weeks to go until the teams are announced.”

Watch the AIG Women’s Open this week live on Sky Sports. The preview show is live on Wednesday August 9 from 4pm on Sky Sports Golf, while coverage of the opening round starts on Thursday August 10 at 11am. Stream the AIG Women’s Open with NOW.



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PGA Tour 2024 season schedule and dates revealed with ‘more at stake every week’ under new plans

Increase in no-cut events and events with limited fields; eight ‘signature events’ form part of 36-event regular season; PGA Tour says new-look schedule will create “excitement for our fans and reward players like never before”; watch the PGA Tour live on Sky Sports Golf

Last Updated: 07/08/23 9:18pm


The PGA Tour has released a new “reimagined” schedule for the 2024 season, which features more no-cut events than ever before and an increased $25m prize for the winner of the FedExCup.

Returning to a calendar-year schedule for the first time since 2012, the PGA Tour has described the events as being “interconnected like never before to deliver maximum drama and consequence”.

The FedExCup Regular Season will consist of 36 events.

The 2024 season begins in early January with the ‘Opening Drive’ double-header at The Sentry and Sony Open in Hawaii, and runs through to the Wyndham Championship in early August.

These tournaments include the four majors, The Players Championship and eight ‘signature events’.

At the end of the regular season, the top 70 players will advance to the FedExCup Playoffs.

“We are excited about the roll-out of the PGA Tour’s reimagined schedule and what the season will offer to our fans: a January start with stars competing head-to-head more often, alongside the weekly drama of life-altering moments and the emergence of new stars,” said PGA Tour commissioner Jay Monahan.

“While winning on the PGA Tour continues to be the ultimate – and most difficult – challenge, we have further connected every tournament, with more at stake each week.

“From The Sentry through the FedExCup Playoffs and into the soon-to-be-announced FedExCup Fall, this new, cadence will create consistent excitement for our fans and reward players like never before.

Charley Hoffman makes an albatross on the 15th hole of the Sedgefield Country Club at the Wyndham Championship

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Charley Hoffman makes an albatross on the 15th hole of the Sedgefield Country Club at the Wyndham Championship

Charley Hoffman makes an albatross on the 15th hole of the Sedgefield Country Club at the Wyndham Championship

“We are grateful to the membership – especially the Player Directors and Player Advisory Council – as well as our tournaments and partners for the collaboration that has set us up for an exciting 2024.”

The release of the 2024 calendar comes two months after the the PGA Tour and DP World Tour announced a shock proposed agreement with Saudi Arabia’s Public Investment Fund, which funds LIV Golf, to form a new joint commercial entity in order to “unify the game”.

The ‘signature events’ explained

Previously referred to as ‘designated events’ in 2023, the newly-renamed signature events underline the continued evolution of the PGA Tour’s season format.

The eight events are limited-field tournaments with increased prize money and FedExCup points.

Five of these will not feature a cut, but the three player-hosted invitationals – The Genesis Invitational, Arnold Palmer Invitational and the Memorial Tournament – will still feature a 36-hole cut to the top 50 and ties and any player within 10 shots of the lead.

The eight ‘signature events’ are as follows:

  • The Sentry (January 1-7)
  • AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am (January 29-February 4)
  • The Genesis Invitational (February 12-18)
  • Arnold Palmer Invitational presented by Mastercard (March 4-10)
  • RBC Heritage (April 15-21)
  • Wells Fargo Championship (May 6-12)
  • the Memorial Tournament presented by Workday (June 3-9)
  • Travelers Championship (June 17-23)
Justin Thomas missed the FedExCup Playoffs in a painful way as his chip attempt stayed out after hitting the pin, meaning he finished outside the top 70 in the points standings

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Justin Thomas missed the FedExCup Playoffs in a painful way as his chip attempt stayed out after hitting the pin, meaning he finished outside the top 70 in the points standings

Justin Thomas missed the FedExCup Playoffs in a painful way as his chip attempt stayed out after hitting the pin, meaning he finished outside the top 70 in the points standings

Explaining the qualification process for these events, the PGA Tour said in a statement: “The 2024 schedule cadence connects events through several new eligibility paths, allowing trending players to earn Signature Event starts and ensuring every member the opportunity to compete alongside the game’s best.

“The Sentry is the season’s first Signature Event and includes PGA TOUR winners from the previous calendar year as well as the top 50 members from the 2022-23 FedExCup standings (i.e. those who qualify for the BMW Championship, the second FedExCup Playoffs event).

“Eligibility for the remaining seven Signature Events (field sizes anticipated to be between 70-80 players) includes the top 50 members from the 2022-23 FedExCup standings and 15 members who can play their way in through The Next 10 and The Swing 5.”

The AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am is a new addition to that list for 2024 and will feature a revised format. Amateurs will now compete alongside professionals (80 players) over the first two rounds, with the competition limited to professionals only for the final two rounds.

Beem: Designated events with cuts will create more excitement

Rich Beem gives his thoughts on the PGA Tour's announcement that a huge change to the schedule is planned for 2024 including eight elevated events with five of those tournaments not having a cut.

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Rich Beem gives his thoughts on the PGA Tour’s announcement that a huge change to the schedule is planned for 2024 including eight elevated events with five of those tournaments not having a cut.

Rich Beem gives his thoughts on the PGA Tour’s announcement that a huge change to the schedule is planned for 2024 including eight elevated events with five of those tournaments not having a cut.

2002 PGA Championship winner and Sky Sports’ Rich Beem on the new calendar:

“Looking at the schedule I think there’s very few surprises. The designated events and those three which are designated, where they will have cuts – the ones that Tiger Woods, Jack Nicklaus and Arnold Palmer host – they are going to have a cut into the low 50 [players] and then it will be an increased purse to the winner from $3.6m to $4m.

“I think that will create a lot more excitement for fans at home and for us watching on TV just for the simple fact that a lot of times this year, especially on Fridays, we are looking at a lot of drama for some players trying to finally make the cut.

“If you look at the way, even the top players in the world play the game at the highest level, they are grinding it as much as they possibly can to stick around for the final 36 because they know anything is possible.

“I’m glad we have at least three of those designated events, out of the eight, that are going to go ahead and have a cut line. I think that’s going to be really valuable. What happens with that will determine whether we have cuts going forward in those designated events.”

Watch all the women’s majors, the Solheim Cup, the Ryder Cup and the end of the PGA Tour and DP World Tour seasons exclusively live over the coming months on Sky Sports Golf. Stream the best sport with NOW

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Ryder Cup watch at The Open: Can Padraig Harrington boost hopes for historic pick for Team Europe?

Two-time Open winner Padraig Harrington sits 60th on the European Points List and 44th on the World Points List as he aims to become the oldest player in Ryder Cup history; Harrington looking to earn more qualification points at The 151st Open, live from Thursday on Sky Sports Golf

Last Updated: 17/07/23 1:25pm


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Legendary golf coach Pete Cowen claims 51-year-old Padraig Harrington deserves a spot in the European team ahead of the Ryder Cup in Rome and reveals increased power has helped him improve his game recently

Legendary golf coach Pete Cowen claims 51-year-old Padraig Harrington deserves a spot in the European team ahead of the Ryder Cup in Rome and reveals increased power has helped him improve his game recently

Time is running out for players to force their way into Ryder Cup consideration, but could a former captain be an option as a captain’s pick for Team Europe in Rome?

The qualification campaign for Luke Donald’s team runs until the start of September, when the three leading players on the European Points List and the next three on the World Points List will be joined by six captain’s picks.

Several of Europe’s last Ryder Cup team will be unable to compete this time around after switching to LIV Golf, while Padraig Harrington – who was captain for the 2021 loss at Whistling Straits – remaining hopeful of forcing his way into Donald’s plans.

Jon Rahm believes Sergio Garcia should be allowed to play at the Ryder Cup and feels politics are getting in the way of a great event

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Jon Rahm believes Sergio Garcia should be allowed to play at the Ryder Cup and feels politics are getting in the way of a great event

Jon Rahm believes Sergio Garcia should be allowed to play at the Ryder Cup and feels politics are getting in the way of a great event

Harrington is without a DP World Tour victory since 2016 but has won five times in 13 months on the PGA Tour Champions, where he has posted top-seven finishes in six of his eight starts, with the former major looking to impress again in The 151st Open at Royal Liverpool.

The 51-year-old would become the oldest player in Ryder Cup history should be make a seventh appearance for Team Europe at Marco Simone Golf Club, with former team-mate Darren Clarke and major-winning coach Pete Cowen both backing him to be selected.

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“I would pick him, definitely,” Cowen said on the R&A’s On the Range show. “The way he’s playing and his experience. He’ll be great in the team room and you can rely on him under pressure

“He’s playing great, so he definitely would be in my team.”

Cowen’s views were echoed by Clarke, who told Sky Sports News: “There’s competition there for spots, but the way Harrington’s been playing with us out in on the Champions Tour, he’s hitting the ball further now than he’s ever hit the ball.

Could Padraig Harrington feature for Team Europe in the Ryder Cup this September?

Could Padraig Harrington feature for Team Europe in the Ryder Cup this September?

“His game is so solid to the green. He’s playing wonderfully well so that’s a good position for Luke (Donald) to have choices of guys playing well, so if he were to pick Padraig (Harrington) I wouldn’t be surprised.”

Harrington open to schedule change to boost hopes

Harrington finished fourth at the season-opening Abu Dhabi HSBC Championship and posted a top 10 on the PGA Tour in April at the Valero Texas Open, with the Irishman also performing well at the US Open and impressing at the Genesis Scottish Open before fading over the weekend.

Padraig Harrington made six consecutive appearances for Team Europe between 1999 and 2010

Padraig Harrington made six consecutive appearances for Team Europe between 1999 and 2010

The three-time major winner had intended to play on the PGA Tour Champions over the summer, although would be open to playing more on the DP World Tour if it will enhance his chances of a first Ryder Cup appearance since 2010.

“I’ve been playing better, getting better and doing things better, Harrington told Sky Sports on Friday. “The Champions Tour has got me focused better and I’ve started putting better.

“So I’m in a nice place, I’ll see how I play over the next two weeks [Scottish Open and The Open] then have a chat with Luke (Donald) and if necessary I’ll change my schedule and come back and play a few in Europe.

Rory McIlroy will be a key part of Luke Donald's Ryder Cup team in Rome

Rory McIlroy will be a key part of Luke Donald’s Ryder Cup team in Rome

“My intention was to go play some Champions Tour events but if I’m genuinely in contention then I’m prepared to make the effort and change my schedule and come back and prove it.”

Team Europe as it stands

Rory McIlroy extended his advantage at the top of the European Points List with his stunning victory at the Genesis Scottish Open on Sunday, where he birdied his final two holes to claim a second successive Rolex Series title.

Highlights from a dramatic final round as Rory McIlroy secured a dramatic victory over Robert MacIntyre at the Scottish Open

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Highlights from a dramatic final round as Rory McIlroy secured a dramatic victory over Robert MacIntyre at the Scottish Open

Highlights from a dramatic final round as Rory McIlroy secured a dramatic victory over Robert MacIntyre at the Scottish Open

McIlroy leads Jon Rahm on that list and closed the gap on the Spaniard on the World Points List, while Robert MacIntyre moved above Yannik Paul and Adrian Meronk into the automatic qualification spots with his runner-up finish at the Renaissance Club.

Viktor Hovland, Tyrrell Hatton and Matt Fitzpatrick hold the other automatic spots as things stand, while Tommy Fleetwood, Victor Perez and Shane Lowry are lurking close behind with just a handful of qualification events remaining.

Which LIV players could feature for Team USA?

The majors are the only opportunity for LIV players from America to earn Ryder Cup qualification points, meaning this week’s event is the last chance to impress and force them into Zach Johnson’s plans for Team USA.

US Ryder Cup captain Zach Johnson said at May's PGA Championship he was unsure whether he'll be picking players from LIV Golf for this year's event

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US Ryder Cup captain Zach Johnson said at May’s PGA Championship he was unsure whether he’ll be picking players from LIV Golf for this year’s event

US Ryder Cup captain Zach Johnson said at May’s PGA Championship he was unsure whether he’ll be picking players from LIV Golf for this year’s event

Koepka is well-placed to qualify automatically after following his runner-up finish at The Masters by winning the PGA Championship this year, while a strong performance this week could mathematically secure him a spot for Team USA.

DeChambeau posted a top-four finish during Koepka’s win at Oak Hill and finished runner-up in last month’s LIV event at Valderrama, where Gooch strengthened his claim for a captain’s pick by registering a third victory of the season.

Rory McIlroy says Brooks Koepka deserves to be on the United States team for the Ryder Cup but his feelings are different for the European players on the LIV tour

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Rory McIlroy says Brooks Koepka deserves to be on the United States team for the Ryder Cup but his feelings are different for the European players on the LIV tour

Rory McIlroy says Brooks Koepka deserves to be on the United States team for the Ryder Cup but his feelings are different for the European players on the LIV tour

Johnson – who won all five of his matches in Team USA’s record-breaking Ryder Cup win in 2021 – arrives with top-10 finishes in his last three worldwide starts, while Reed was only one stroke back during the latest LIV Golf League event in London earlier this month.

If any of the American contingent were crowned Champion Golfer of the Year this week, it would be difficult for Johnson not to include them among his six captain’s picks when he finalises his team at the end of August.

Watch The 151st Open throughout the week exclusively live on Sky Sports. Live coverage of the opening round begins on Thursday July 20 from 6.30am on Sky Sports Golf.



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PGA Tour and PIF drop poaching clause from agreement | ‘Unnecessary in spirit of cooperation’

The non-solicitation clause in the agreement stated that the PIF, the PGA Tour and European tour would no longer “solicit or recruit any players who are members of the other tours or organizations to become members of their respective organizations”

Last Updated: 14/07/23 7:58am


As part of the original agreement, there was a clause that said each entity would no longer “solicit or recruit any players who are members of the other tours”

The PGA Tour and the Saudi Public Investment Fund have responded to a Justice Department inquiry by dropping a clause in their agreement that would have prohibited the poaching of players.

The Justice Department’s antitrust review began last summer and expanded when the PGA Tour and Saudi Arabia’s PIF agreed to a partnership.

The non-solicitation clause was part of the framework agreement announced June 6 and signed by the PGA Tour, DP World Tour and PIF.

The agreement, still being negotiated and requiring PGA Tour board approval, is for the parties to form a for-profit company that would pool commercial businesses and rights. During a Senate hearing on Tuesday, PGA Tour chief operating officer Ron Price said PIF would contribute at least $1bn.

Speaking on the Golf Channel, NBC's Capitol Hill correspondent Ryan Nobles explains what happened in the US Senate's hearing into the PGA Tour's merger with the Saudi Public Investment Fund

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Speaking on the Golf Channel, NBC’s Capitol Hill correspondent Ryan Nobles explains what happened in the US Senate’s hearing into the PGA Tour’s merger with the Saudi Public Investment Fund

Speaking on the Golf Channel, NBC’s Capitol Hill correspondent Ryan Nobles explains what happened in the US Senate’s hearing into the PGA Tour’s merger with the Saudi Public Investment Fund

Key to the agreement was dropping all antitrust litigation, which a federal judge signed off on last month. Below that section was the non-solicitation clause that said PIF, the PGA Tour and European tour would no longer “solicit or recruit any players who are members of the other tours or organizations to become members of their respective organizations.”

The clause was effective May 30, when the agreement was signed.

Following the removal of the clause, the PGA Tour told Sky Sports: “The Framework Agreement sets the stage for an exciting future for professional golf that re-establishes competition at the highest levels of the sport and creates the biggest stage for everyone – players, sponsors, and fans.

“Based on discussions with staff at the Department of Justice, we chose to remove specific language from the Framework Agreement.

“While we believe the language is lawful, we also consider it unnecessary in the spirit of cooperation and because all parties are negotiating in good faith.”

Defending Open champion Cameron Smith admits his victory at St Andrews last year was overshadowed by his defection to LIV Golf but he nonetheless feels he made the right decision

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Defending Open champion Cameron Smith admits his victory at St Andrews last year was overshadowed by his defection to LIV Golf but he nonetheless feels he made the right decision

Defending Open champion Cameron Smith admits his victory at St Andrews last year was overshadowed by his defection to LIV Golf but he nonetheless feels he made the right decision

The Times reported antitrust experts warned the clause could violate federal law if it threatened the integrity of the labour market and promised to stifle competition for players, who are independent.

The agreement sets a December 31 deadline for finalizing the deal, though both sides can agree to an extension and with LIV Golf having a set 48-man roster for this season, alternates are available for injury, it was unlikely any player would have left for LIV until the 2024 season.

McIlroy: I would rather retire than join LIV

Rory McIlroy has made it abundantly clear how he felt about short-lived proposals that he and Tiger Woods could own LIV Golf teams and play in at least 10 events a season.

Rory McIlroy was satisfied with his performance on the greens with an impressive six under par 64 after round one at the Scottish Open

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Rory McIlroy was satisfied with his performance on the greens with an impressive six under par 64 after round one at the Scottish Open

Rory McIlroy was satisfied with his performance on the greens with an impressive six under par 64 after round one at the Scottish Open

Before the agreement was reached between the PGA Tour, DP World Tour, and PIF, PCP Capital Partners gave a presentation to two PGA Tour officials entitled “The Best of Both Worlds” that featured the McIlroy and Woods proposal as part of a lengthy wish-list which included PIF governor Yasir Al-Rumayyan becoming a member of the R&A and Augusta National.

Neither had any chance of success even if McIlroy – who said he still “hated” LIV when the framework agreement was announced – has now taken a step back from his role as the biggest advocate of the PGA Tour.

“If LIV Golf was the last place to play golf on earth I would retire. That’s how I feel about it,” McIlroy said after an opening 64 in the Genesis Scottish Open, which is live on Sky Sports.

Rory McIlroy shot a six-under par 64 to take a share of the clubhouse lead at the Scottish Open

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Rory McIlroy shot a six-under par 64 to take a share of the clubhouse lead at the Scottish Open

Rory McIlroy shot a six-under par 64 to take a share of the clubhouse lead at the Scottish Open

“There’s quite a bit of apathy towards everything at the moment.

“There wasn’t a lot of new information there for me [in the Senate hearing], there maybe was for other people, but as I said, I’ve almost been too close to it over the last year and a bit so it’s nice to be able to try to distance myself a bit from it.

“The thing that I’ve realised is, no matter what I do or say or try to show leadership, I’m going to be just fine.

“I’ve tried to step up for maybe the guys that didn’t have a voice early on, but I think with everything that’s transpired over the last few weeks the players are going to find themselves more and more at the table to try to get whatever that is they want out of it.

“Again, as long as I get to play the golf that I’ve known over the last 15 years of my career, I’ll be happy.”

Watch The Scottish Open between July 13-16 ahead of The 151st Open at Royal Liverpool from July 20-23, both live on Sky Sports.

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Nick Faldo says Rory McIlroy can thrive now golf’s future has become clearer and does not expect LIV to survive new deal between tours

The PGA Tour, DP World Tour and LIV Golf announced a historic partnership at the beginning of this month; Sir Nick Faldo, who is hosting this week’s Betfred British Masters, believes world No 3 Rory McIlroy can be the chief beneficiary of the proposed new partnership

Last Updated: 28/06/23 2:21pm


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Sir Nick Faldo says he thought LIV Golf would just fade away and believes there was no atmosphere or proper competition in their events

Sir Nick Faldo says he thought LIV Golf would just fade away and believes there was no atmosphere or proper competition in their events

Sir Nick Faldo believes Rory McIlroy can be the key beneficiary of the current state of flux within golf.

The Northern Irishman finished second in the US Open earlier this month and is currently ranked third in the world, behind world No 1 Scottie Scheffler and the Spaniard Jon Rahm.

After the PGA Tour, DP World Tour and LIV Golf announced a historic partnership at the beginning of June, it seems that the chaos which enveloped the top end of the sport may finally be headed towards a conclusion.

Faldo believes McIlroy can thrive following the shock agreement being struck – and reckons his runner-up finish in the US Open shows how well he’s playing.

“We criticise him for finishing second,” said Faldo. “He’s playing beautifully so if he can just get those wedges a smidgen closer, that changes everything.

“Putting under pressure, to putting for birdie, is a huge difference. I wouldn’t be surprised if he’s seriously inspired at Hoylake. That’s where he won last time (the 2014 Open).

“There is scar tissue from nine years without a major and not too many players have come back from a long gap and then go on to reboot your career and win more, but I’m sure he would just love to be able to bowl up, go and practice and play with minimal off-course work and interference.

“You need that when you’re trying to play your best. You’ve got to have that all day long.”

Andrew Coltart explains how he would feel if he was in Rory McIlroy's position after news emerged of the partnership between the PGA Tour, DP World Tour and LIV Golf

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Andrew Coltart explains how he would feel if he was in Rory McIlroy’s position after news emerged of the partnership between the PGA Tour, DP World Tour and LIV Golf

Andrew Coltart explains how he would feel if he was in Rory McIlroy’s position after news emerged of the partnership between the PGA Tour, DP World Tour and LIV Golf

McIlroy admitted he felt like a “sacrificial lamb” when the proposed deal was announced, the four-time major winner having emerged as the public face of the PGA Tour in its battle with LIV.

The following week, he cancelled his pre-tournament press conference ahead of the US Open at Los Angeles Country Club, where he finished second to Wyndham Clark to extend his major championship drought.

“I’m pretty sure Rory’s suffered from being constantly asked, being a spokesman (for the PGA Tour),” Faldo said. “You want a clear head when you go and play golf, you want to be able to concentrate.

“I’d rather be playing well and fending off questions about why I finished second than why I finished 152nd. If you finish second, it’s stewards’ inquiry and a dissection but he’s there, he’s playing that well every week.”

Faldo: LIV will not survive | Mickelson: We have confidence in LIV

Earlier this month, the PGA Tour announced it was creating a new commercial entity with the DP World Tour and Saudi Arabia’s Public Investment Fund (PIF), which bankrolls the breakaway circuit.

The deal is subject to judicial scrutiny in the United States and details remain thin on the ground, but the “framework agreement” does state that LIV’s future will be determined by the new entity, whose board will be controlled by a PGA Tour majority.

Sky Sports News' Jamie Weir explains the implications of the partnership between the PGA Tour, DP World Tour and LIV Golf

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Sky Sports News’ Jamie Weir explains the implications of the partnership between the PGA Tour, DP World Tour and LIV Golf

Sky Sports News’ Jamie Weir explains the implications of the partnership between the PGA Tour, DP World Tour and LIV Golf

Asked ahead of the British Masters if LIV can survive, tournament host and six-time major winner Faldo said: “I don’t think so, because nobody’s really interested.

“They’re not going to get the sponsorship that they want. They call it a team (event) and it’s not because it’s strokeplay.

“You see your mates on the putting green and say ‘play well’ and you see them in the scorers tent and say ‘What did you shoot?’ That’s it. A team is out there helping, shoulder to shoulder. That’s a true team.

“You have the ultimate team event, the Ryder Cup, you know the passion and the atmosphere of that. They’re not playing with the same passion and atmosphere as the Ryder Cup.

“It’s only half a dozen (players) that are really current, half of the field I don’t really know and half the field are there for the very nice last-placed money that you still get if you shoot 20 over.”

Phil Mickelson in action at the US Masters earlier this year

Phil Mickelson in action at the US Masters earlier this year

Unsurprisingly, LIV player and HyFlyers team captain Phil Mickelson has a different view and believes everything that the rebels were promised by LIV Golf CEO Greg Norman is coming to pass.

“I think that right now we have basically an agreement to have an agreement and everything over the last couple of years that we’ve been told by Greg and everybody on LIV has come to fruition, so we have a lot of confidence in what they have been saying to us because everything has been happening,” Mickelson said, ahead of the LIV event in Valderrama.

Asked if he felt vindicated by developments, Mickelson added: “I would say I felt appreciation that we got to this point where we’re working together because it makes me confident with where the game of golf is headed in the future.

“We felt like it was going to be about two years roughly before we got to that point. It took a year and a half, or six months quicker than I thought it would be.”

Watch live coverage of both the DP World Tour and PGA Tour on Sky Sports from Thursday with the Betfred British Masters from 1pm and the first round of the Rocket Mortgage Classic from 6.30pm, both live on Sky Sports Golf.



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US Open: Historic week in Los Angeles as major records tumble during Wyndham Clark’s victory

The US Open saw multiple holes-in-one, two players breaking the lowest round recorded in tournament history and a host of records broken; We look at some of the key moments from Wyndham Clark’s one-shot victory and maiden major title

Last Updated: 19/06/23 11:02pm


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Highlights of the final round from the 123rd US Open as Wyndham Clark held off Rory McIlroy to claim his first major win

Highlights of the final round from the 123rd US Open as Wyndham Clark held off Rory McIlroy to claim his first major win

Wyndham Clark etched his name into the history books with his victory at the US Open, becoming golf’s latest first-time major champion as part of a record-breaking week in Los Angeles.

Clark followed his breakthrough PGA Tour title last month at the Wells Fargo Championship by registering a maiden major, finishing a shot clear of Rory McIlroy at Los Angeles Country Club, with world No 1 Scottie Scheffler claiming third spot ahead of Open champion Cameron Smith.

It’s the seventh time in eight years the US Open has produced a first-time major winner, while the tournament will remain long in the memory for all the note-worth records equalled or broken during an entertaining week.

Watch the moment Wyndham Clark became a major winner with victory at the 2023 US Open at Los Angeles Country Club, two-putting on the 72nd hole to claim the trophy

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Watch the moment Wyndham Clark became a major winner with victory at the 2023 US Open at Los Angeles Country Club, two-putting on the 72nd hole to claim the trophy

Watch the moment Wyndham Clark became a major winner with victory at the 2023 US Open at Los Angeles Country Club, two-putting on the 72nd hole to claim the trophy

Benign conditions and favourable pins on Thursday saw six players card scores of 65 or lower, the most in single round at a US Open, with this year’s opening round marking the first time in the tournament’s history that the whole field has managed to post a sub-80 score.

Rickie Fowler and Xander Schauffele were the standout performers on a low-scoring opening day, with Fowler becoming the first player in US Open history to card a ’62 round’ after posting 10 birdies – equalling another record – to set the clubhouse target at eight under.

A look at the highlights from Rickie Fowler's stunning eight-under round of 62 that set a new US Open record, quickly equalled by Xander Schauffele

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A look at the highlights from Rickie Fowler’s stunning eight-under round of 62 that set a new US Open record, quickly equalled by Xander Schauffele

A look at the highlights from Rickie Fowler’s stunning eight-under round of 62 that set a new US Open record, quickly equalled by Xander Schauffele

Schauffele matched Fowler’s total just over 20 minutes later after his bogey-free start to the week, with the pair joining Branden Grace – who set the initial record at The Open in 2017 – in equalling the lowest round in major history.

The field scoring average was 71.38 on Thursday, the lowest for an opening round of the US Open and the third lowest recorded at the event, while the par-three 15th became just the third hole in a US Open to give up multiple holes-in-one on the same day.

Sam Burns produced the second hole-in-one of the first day of the US Open, nailing his tee shot at the par-three 15th to match the feat by Matthieu Pavon

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Sam Burns produced the second hole-in-one of the first day of the US Open, nailing his tee shot at the par-three 15th to match the feat by Matthieu Pavon

Sam Burns produced the second hole-in-one of the first day of the US Open, nailing his tee shot at the par-three 15th to match the feat by Matthieu Pavon

Matthieu Pavon and Sam Burns both made aces on the opening day, with Matt Fitzpatrick then becoming the first defending champion to make a hole-in-one when he posted the third of the tournament on the par-three 15th early in the second round.

Fowler continued to set more records on his way to opening up a one-shot halfway lead, with the 34-year-old birdieing his opening three holes to move to 11 under quicker than any player has ever managed in the tournament’s history.

Watch how Rickie Fowler opened his second round of the US Open with three straight birdies

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Watch how Rickie Fowler opened his second round of the US Open with three straight birdies

Watch how Rickie Fowler opened his second round of the US Open with three straight birdies

A rollercoaster second round saw Fowler post just four pars in a two-under 68, with the American smashing the 36-hole tournament record for most birdies by adding eight on Friday to take his tally to 18.

Fowler’s 130 shots taken across the first two days also equalled the lowest 36-hole score in US Open history, matching the total set by Martin Kaymer on his way to victory in 2014, with tournament records continuing to tumble over the weekend.

Highlights from the second round of the US Open at Los Angeles Country Club, where Rickie Fowler and Rory McIlroy both impressed

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Highlights from the second round of the US Open at Los Angeles Country Club, where Rickie Fowler and Rory McIlroy both impressed

Highlights from the second round of the US Open at Los Angeles Country Club, where Rickie Fowler and Rory McIlroy both impressed

Attention on Saturday once again centred around the par-three 15th, which became the shortest hole in US Open history when it measured at just 81 yards. That was some 219 yards shorter than the yardage for the par-three seventh, which was just a yard short from tying the longest par-three in the tournament’s history.

Tom Kim made an early weekend charge with a front-nine 29 in his third round, reeling off six birdies in a fast start, while Austin Eckroat also turned in 29 on Sunday to also equal the lowest nine-hole score ever recorded at the US Open.

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It was the first time two 29s have been recorded in one week at a US Open, while Tommy Fleetwood became the first player to recorded multiple 63s in the US Open and just the fourth to do so in major history during his stunning final round.

Fleetwood’s fast finish saw him match the same total he posted on the final day of the 2018 contest, lifting him into tied-fifth, as McIlroy fell just short in his bid for a fifth major title and first since 2014.

Rory McIlroy missed out on a first major in nine years after falling one shot short in the US Open at Los Angeles Country Club, a number of near misses with the putter proved to be the difference

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Rory McIlroy missed out on a first major in nine years after falling one shot short in the US Open at Los Angeles Country Club, a number of near misses with the putter proved to be the difference

Rory McIlroy missed out on a first major in nine years after falling one shot short in the US Open at Los Angeles Country Club, a number of near misses with the putter proved to be the difference

McIlroy ended the week on nine under and with a total score of 271, the lowest 72-hole total at the US Open a non-winner, with the 59 greens in regulation made during the week also a tournament record for someone who didn’t go on to claim victory.

What’s next?

The PGA Tour heads to TPC River Highlands next for the Travelers Championship, with McIlroy and Scheffler part of a strong field scheduled to feature 23 of the world’s top 30. Early coverage begins on Thursday from midday via the red button on Sky Sports Golf, ahead of full coverage from 8pm.

Three of the four men’s majors are now completed, with The 151st Open taking place at Royal Liverpool from July 20-23 and exclusively live on Sky Sports.



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US Open: Brooks Koepka relishing more US Open ‘chaos’ and sets ‘double digits’ major target

Brooks Koepka, who won the US Open in 2017 and 2018, claimed a fifth major last month with a two-shot victory at the PGA Championship; Can Koepka enjoy more major success? Watch the US Open live on Thursday from 3pm on Sky Sports Golf

Last Updated: 13/06/23 8:31pm


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Jon Rahm and Brooks Koepka both share their feelings on the new agreement between the PGA Tour, DP World Tour and Saudi Arabia’s PIF

Jon Rahm and Brooks Koepka both share their feelings on the new agreement between the PGA Tour, DP World Tour and Saudi Arabia’s PIF

Brooks Koepka is relishing more “chaos” at the US Open as he looks to follow on from his PGA Championship success and continue his ambitious pursuit of a double-digit major tally.

Koepka won four majors between 2017 and 2019 before seeing his career hampered by injury, with the former world No 1 then switching from the PGA Tour to the Saudi-backed LIV Golf circuit last summer.

The American bounced back from squandering a two-shot lead in the final round of The Masters in April, where he finished tied-second as Jon Rahm claimed victory, to claim a fifth major title with a two-shot victory at Oak Hill last month.

Highlights from the final round of the 2023 PGA Championship at Oak Hill, where Brooks Koepka claimed the Wanamaker Trophy for a third time

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Highlights from the final round of the 2023 PGA Championship at Oak Hill, where Brooks Koepka claimed the Wanamaker Trophy for a third time

Highlights from the final round of the 2023 PGA Championship at Oak Hill, where Brooks Koepka claimed the Wanamaker Trophy for a third time

Koepka is among the pre-tournament favourites once again at Los Angeles Country Club, with the 33-year-old confident of focusing on his own game in a week where conversation is dominated by the shock agreement between the tours to try and unify the sport.

“The more chaotic things get, the easier it gets for me,” Koepka explained in his pre-tournament press conference. “Everything starts to slow down and I am able to focus on whatever I need to focus on while everybody else is dealing with distractions, worried about other things.

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“I think there’s a few of them [reasons why he peaks at majors], but I think it [enjoying chaos] is definitely one of them. I enjoy the chaos.

“I’m pretty sure I know what it takes to compete in majors. I’ve won five of them and been second four times. And just over my track record how to prepare when you’re here, how to prepare when you’re home for it, I’ve got that, I guess, on lock.”

Brooks Koepka is looking to win a third US Open and sixth major title

Brooks Koepka is looking to win a third US Open and sixth major title

Koepka sets ambitious major target

Jack Nicklaus, Tiger Woods and Walter Hagen are the only male golfers in history to win 10 or major titles in their careers, although Koepka feels he can join that group after a PGA Championship victory he describes as the favourite of his major titles.

“They all mean something different, but this last one [PGA Championship], for all the stuff I had to deal with, all the pain, the tears, all the stuff that went into it,” Koepka, who won the US Open in 2017 and 2018, added.

As Brooks Koepka aims to win his third US Open title this week, check out his five previous major victories.

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As Brooks Koepka aims to win his third US Open title this week, check out his five previous major victories.

As Brooks Koepka aims to win his third US Open title this week, check out his five previous major victories.

“Like I said, there’s probably five, seven people in this whole world that really know what I went through and that were there every step of the way. I think they enjoyed it maybe even more than I did.”

On his major target, Koepka said: “I think one thing that was always harped on me was you knew how many majors Jack [Nicklaus] has, you knew how many Tiger [Woods] has, you knew how many Arnold Palmer has, you knew how many Gary Player, [Tom] Watson, all these legends, but I never knew how many PGA Tour events or wins they had total.

Rory McIlroy says Brooks Koepka deserves to be on the United States team for the Ryder Cup but his feelings are different for the European players on the LIV circuit

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Rory McIlroy says Brooks Koepka deserves to be on the United States team for the Ryder Cup but his feelings are different for the European players on the LIV circuit

Rory McIlroy says Brooks Koepka deserves to be on the United States team for the Ryder Cup but his feelings are different for the European players on the LIV circuit

“That’s what you’re judged on. It’s major championships. You look at basketball, you’re judged on how many championships you’ve won, not how many games you’ve won. Same thing in every sport.

“Like I said, double digits, that’s what I’m trying to get to. I don’t think it’s out of the question for me. I think the way I’ve prepared, the way I’ve kind of suited my game for these things is going to help me.

Brooks Koepka played a practice round with fellow LIV member Dustin Johnson ahead of the US Open

Brooks Koepka played a practice round with fellow LIV member Dustin Johnson ahead of the US Open

“I’m only 33, so I’ve definitely got quite a bit of time. I’ve just got to stay healthy and keep doing what I’m doing.”

Could Koepka return to the PGA Tour?

Koepka was left surprised by the PGA Tour and DP World Tour’s plans to merge their commercial operations with the golf-related businesses of Saudi Arabia’s Public Investment Fund (PIF), who bankroll LIV, although refused to get drawn on his future career plans.

Dustin Johnson says his understanding is that LIV Golf will still be running a full schedule in 2024, while Cameron Smith and Matt Fitzpatrick admit they were surprised by the PGA Tour and PIF's new deal.

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Dustin Johnson says his understanding is that LIV Golf will still be running a full schedule in 2024, while Cameron Smith and Matt Fitzpatrick admit they were surprised by the PGA Tour and PIF’s new deal.

Dustin Johnson says his understanding is that LIV Golf will still be running a full schedule in 2024, while Cameron Smith and Matt Fitzpatrick admit they were surprised by the PGA Tour and PIF’s new deal.

“We [LIV players] didn’t hear anything about it,” Koepka explained. I think that’s the one thing that shocked everybody the most. I ran into Rickie [Fowler] and JT [Justin Thomas] after watching the whole thing and I asked if they knew, and they said they didn’t know.

“I’m not going to go into the future. I don’t have a crystal ball with me. I’m just worried about the US Open. If I can get to [major] No 6 pretty quick, that would be nice. It’s a lot of what-if games. I’m not going to play the what-if game. If it happens, it happens. If it doesn’t happen, it doesn’t happen.”

Who will win the US Open? Watch the third men’s major of the year exclusively live on Sky Sports. Live coverage begins on Thursday from 3pm on Sky Sports Golf.



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