Queer Sporting Alliance boosting gender diversity in sport

In March this year, the Queer Sporting Alliance (QSA) took out the Outstanding Contribution to Sport Award at the Victorian Pride Awards.

The QSA is Australia and New Zealand’s largest LGBTIQA+ sporting club, and the award recognises its ongoing efforts to provide queer-friendly sporting environments and events.

They have included Australia’s first and largest queer basketball tournament, which featured more than 180 players from around Australia and took place on Wurundjeri Country in the northern suburbs of Naarm/Melbourne in January 2024.

The QSA’s focus is on participation and creating a space for those who have previously been excluded from sport.

The QSA focuses on creating safe spaces for those who have previously been excluded from sport. (Supplied: Kirsty Marshall)

Some participants had not played basketball in many years before the tournament, and for some it was their first time stepping onto a court.

The tournament, and all QSA programs, welcome queer folk as well as straight allies.

“It was like Mardi Gras but for gays who love sport,” participant Jethro Athlas said.

“It was my dream come true.”

QSA president Stella Lesic said the tournament was significant because it ensured players of any gender identity could participate.

Queer Sporting Alliance President Stella Lesic defends the basketball

Queer Sporting Alliance president Stella Lesic said the tournament did not require players to out themselves.(Supplied: Monique Clarke)

“The tournament didn’t require any player to out themselves [unless they wanted to] or have a referee assume their gender for the purpose of applying mixed/gendered basketball rules,” they said.

“Particularly for players taking steps to gender affirmation or who have experienced transphobia in sport, our tournament and the QLeague are game-changing.

“For the first time in basketball’s history, players could just play.”

Associate professor Ada Cheung is a clinician, scientist and endocrinologist specialising in the treatment of transgender individuals and sees the benefits the QSA brings to the community.

“What QSA does is beneficial, not just for queer people, but for everybody,” she says.

“[At] the grassroots level, there needs to be much more of a focus on participation [for gender diverse people].”

Woman with short hair wearing a red shirt and black jacket, sitting in an office.

Ada Cheung says there should be more focus on the participation of gender diverse people in sport. (ABC News)

Bringing queer people back to basketball

Athlas started basketball at 11 years old and played until they came out as non-binary at 23.

“I felt I couldn’t show up as me with the binary rules of a regular competition and I didn’t have many other queer friends at the time to make a team that felt safe,” they said.

Fellow tournament participant Leigh Seelie had a similar story of dropping out of sport after coming out as trans.

“I played on and off during my adulthood and stopped around four years ago as I started to transition,” she said.

“I did not feel that the captain of my team would accept me as they had made a number of transphobic posts on Facebook.

“I did not find a new team as I was concerned about how people would react to me playing and I did not want to be spotlighted.

“When the [QSA] tournament came up, I was very excited to play … It felt like a great opportunity to play a sport I loved again.”

The referee awards a four point shot in the QSA basketball tournament

Many QSA tournament participants have similar stories of dropping out of mainstream sport. (Supplied: Kirsty Marshall)

While at first Seelie felt “overwhelmed” about playing in the tournament after time away from the game, she said her team made her feel very welcome.

“I felt a huge amount of joy just being able to be me and play a game I loved,” she said.

With more than 1,000 members registered around Australia, the QSA has also seen an influx of straight, cisgender men and women joining the club.

“QLeague is a joy,” QSA regular and ally Greg Craske said.

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Matt Walsh exposes alleged gender transition approval ‘scam’ (video)

We cannot independently verify any of this, but if what he is saying and showing is true… yike.

This afternoon, Matt Walsh dropped a thread allegedly exposing gatekeeper organizations that are not actually gatekeepers:

Not a gatekeeper. Keep that in mind.

So, according to Walsh, they are supposed to be gatekeepers. They are supposed to be part of a long approval process that includes significant checks and balances to ensure that no one enters into this life-altering procedure lightly. But, according to Walsh, some people and companies have completely subverted this role:

Except they are supposed to be part of the process of ensuring it is necessary.

And that is the end of the thread. We will say that we suspect that in truth these people still rationalize it so that in their minds they are doing their patients a favor. The ideology of transgender is that you are whatever you say you are, at least when it comes to sex and gender. So, they probably rationalize their subversion of the process as necessary to get these people the help they think they need. That’s our guess, for what it is worth, but we believe that it is rare for a person to be consciously evil. And make no mistake, if what Walsh is reporting is true, this is evil.

And this even resulted in a tip:

Obviously, we don’t know if any of this is true, but we wouldn’t be surprised if someone does the gumshoe investigation needed to find out, one way or the other. So, with that caveat, the full text says:

Matt, if you send an investigative reporter over to @VUMChealth that is happening today.

A friend of a friend is a nurse who was placed involuntarily in gender reassignment surgical practice (@VanderbiltU has bullied/intimidated her when she asked to move). Based on high volume (VUMC runs one surgeon to 4-5 patients at the same time – Dr just flits around castrating in parallel) she asked how much informed consent/counseling they get. Surgeon laughed. He said he would do it through a drive-through window as long as they’re paying.

VU ramped up their surgical operations after the child mutilation ban in order to make up lost revenue – go look at how haphazard and frivolous they are about castrating/mutilating mentally ill adults. Transing the disturbed is BIG BUSINESS.

Indeed, it is not just the mentally ill. As ‘The Redheaded Libertarian’ pointed out with a meme, autistic people are disproportionately likely to be subjected to transitioning:

Since the picture cuts off the meme, here’s the full picture:

One person responded with ugliness:

That gave rise to a nice comeback:

And she has some cause to say what she said:

Still, while we think people rationalize this as not being just about the money, there is a lot of money in it:

And, of course, that means that anyone who buys health insurance is probably paying for this—not to mention the various types of government health care programs that are required to. It is past time for the term ‘need’ to be defined so it doesn’t just include when people just really, really want something. Indeed, the notion that this is necessary surgery leads to another potential problem:

That sounds like speculation to us. We would hope that the rational principle of ‘triage’ would keep hospitals from delaying cancer care for transitioning surgery, for instance. However, let’s just say our faith in the rationality of the medical profession has been shaken in the last few years. Most medical professionals are probably rational, but there are definite pockets of crazy—the pockets of crazy seem to be popping up in every profession, these days.

Lawyer Ted Frank points out that in a sane world this would at least result in criminal investigations:

Yeah, we aren’t holding our breath, and we are pretty sure Mr. Frank isn’t, either.

Anyway, one thing that occurred to us is that this might be the beginning of bigger plans. The other day we covered how the Daily Wire released Matt Walsh’s ‘What is a Woman?’ for free (for a limited time) on Twitter and how Twitter initially attempted to suppress the movie—contrary to the wishes of Elon Musk. In all of that, Walsh said something that we think might take on new meaning, now:

‘What a great way to ring in pride month.’

Is it possible that Walsh has multiple bombshell ‘events’ he is planning throughout pride month? First, he premiers his movie. Then one of his previously anonymous sources sheds her anonymity. And now this. Could it be his plan to basically carpet bomb the entire month with events like this?

Well, dear reader, we shall keep an eye on this for you and let you know. And if you can support this website in any way, we would appreciate it.

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Wood Mackenzie: Oil and mining companies must adapt new strategies to deliver low-carbon transition

As companies in the energy and natural resource sector struggle to find the balance between satisfying shareholder returns and meeting stakeholder low-carbon demands, new strategies are emerging that could be the catalyst to drive capital allocation decisions toward growth and closing valuation gaps, according to ‘Fuelling Change’ a new Horizons report from Wood Mackenzie.
“In the last year, energy security has trumped sustainability,” said Tom Ellacott, Senior Vice President, Corporate Research for Wood Mackenzie. “Companies too have benefitted from recent commodity prices and margins to deliver record cash flow.”

“That is not to say that decarbonisation goals cannot be met and priorities cannot change. But to spur activity, there needs to be a recalibration of current risks and rewards for investment in low carbon technologies, as well as new incentives from both government stakeholders and financial institutions. There’s no one answer, but smart oil and gas and natural resources companies will realise that protecting the status quo would be a mistake and start to manage their portfolios to reflect a balanced approach of managing legacy output and carbon management.”

According to the report, companies can address this complex dynamic in three key ways: nurturing legacy cash cows while simultaneously shifting to a transition-growth mindset, incorporating transition risks and rewards into differentiated investment hurdles rates and using new business models to enable growth and close valuation discounts.

Shifting risk-reward balance

Expected reinvestment rates (investment as a percentage of operating cash flow) in oil and gas companies and miners of between 40% and 50% trail the investment rates of utilities chasing growth. Reinvestment rates in both sectors have been trending down since the middle of the last decade.

In a large part, this has been due to strategies such as capital restraint and massive buybacks that have been successful for companies and investors. The oil and gas and metals and mining sectors have outperformed the broader market by 44% and 16%, respectively, since the end of 2021.

“Realistically, the only way to change investor sentiment is to bring about further shifts in the risk-reward equation,” said Ellacott. “We will have to see this in a variety of ways. Examples are government support schemes like the Inflation Reduction Act in the US, regulations such as The European Carbon Border Adjustment Mechanism, or customer-driven market creation, such as a willingness from consumers to pay premiums for low-carbon energy. Financial institutions could also play a big part by punishing slow-to-change companies with higher borrowing rates. This will all hopefully drive new investment inflection points that will catalyse more activity for low-carbon energies.”

Managing investment inflection points

Wind and solar have passed through inflection points and are scaling rapidly, thanks to strong infusions of capital. A similar point will have to be reached for the energy transition support system – metals, CCUS, bioenergy, hydrogen and charging infrastructure.

“The evolution of policy is a big unknown. Companies may face the capital allocation dilemma of high hydrocarbon returns versus lower-risk, lower-return transition-enabling projects for decades yet,” said James Whiteside, Head of Corporate Metals and Mining for Wood Mackenzie. “Rather than chasing carrots or ducking sticks, companies need to develop robust strategies to navigate the unfolding regulatory landscape of the energy transition. The metals most exposed to the transition, such as lithium and rare earth elements, have garnered more media attention than established commodities such as nickel, copper and aluminium. But it is these base metals that need to mobilise the most growth capital to achieve climate goals.”

According to the report, there are three key routes for corporate boards to navigate this dynamic:

Tend to the legacy cash cows while shifting to a transition growth mindset. Investors expect companies to balance the need for returns in the short term by tending to their legacy portfolio, while delivering low carbon transformation plans. Visibility of low-carbon profit centres starting to support – and supplant – the legacy cash cows could be a revaluation trigger that shifts the market to a transition growth mindset. Companies can scale back share buybacks to fund the shift. The mining majors and international oil companies allocated US$157 billion, or 30% of their operating cash flow, to buybacks in 2022. Companies could still grow base dividends and lift reinvestment rates to over 60%.

Bend hurdle rates to reflect transition risks and rewards. Internal hurdle rates need to follow the divergence in external costs of capital, risk and long-term growth potential. Part of the low ‘return’ of transitional investment is risk avoidance and optionality. Higher returns could be up for grabs in low-carbon projects with greater commercial risk, such as CCUS developments that include carbon price risk. In times of uncertainty, companies need a bigger portfolio of options to manage risk.

Use Mergers and Acquisitions (M&A) and new business models to enable growth and close valuation discounts. Major oil companies are already using M&A to accelerate expansion into low-carbon businesses, such as biofuels, biogas and renewable power. However, overall capital allocated to low-carbon M&A remains limited. Mining majors also continue to take a low-risk approach to acquisitions of transition-focused commodities. New or modified business models can help reduce the transition valuation discount and support efficient capital allocation in businesses with quite different costs of capital and risk-reward profiles.

“A transition growth mindset does not mean abandoning capital discipline if combined with risk-adjusted and transparent hurdle rates,” said Ellacott. “There are different horses for different courses, depending on a company’s scale, portfolio make-up, geographical focus and legacy skillset. The prize is worth fighting for, bending the carbon curve to limit the world’s temperatures to well below 2°C. And a balanced, disciplined, transition-focused investment approach could grow corporate cash flows sustainably, boosting company valuations.”

Read the entire report here.

Read the article online at: https://www.oilfieldtechnology.com/drilling-and-production/20042023/wood-mackenzie-oil-and-mining-companies-must-adapt-new-strategies-to-deliver-low-carbon-transition/



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