U.S. vs. Iran at the World Cup: What time it starts, where to watch


This is the match that will either advance Team USA to the round of 16 in the 2022 World Cup or see America knocked out of the international soccer tournament.

The United States faces Iran on Tuesday at 2 p.m. Eastern in Doha, Qatar, coming on the heels of the U.S. recording a 1-1 tie against Wales and a scoreless draw against England last week.

But a tie won’t keep Team USA alive this time; in order to finish in either the first or second spot in Group B and win a place in the knockout bracket, the U.S. must beat Iran.

Iran, meanwhile, is coming off of a stunning 2-0 victory over Wales on Friday (after falling to England, 6-2, in its World Cup opener earlier in the week.) The Iranian team could stay in the tournament through a few scenarios: beating Team USA; or tying with Team USA if Wales draws or loses against England. (As for England and Wales, they will be playing at the same time that the U.S. and Iran play).

But Iran will also be eliminated from the tournament if they lose on Tuesday. So the stakes are high for both teams to score a victory.

What’s more, tensions flared up between the two teams this week after U.S. Soccer’s official social-media accounts temporarily posted a version of Iran’s national flag without the emblem of the Islamic Republic, which was done in a show of solidarity with protesters in Iran — namely those supporting women’s rights. “We wanted to show our support for the women in Iran with our graphic for 24 hours,” the U.S. Soccer Federation said in a statement. In response, Iran’s government accused America of removing the name of God from its flag, and reportedly called for America to be disqualified from the World Cup over the incident.

Read more: Tehran said to have pushed for U.S. team’s ouster from Qatar World Cup over Iranian flag flap

And: Why is the Qatar World Cup so controversial? Here’s a list of issues overshadowing FIFA’s quadrennial showpiece.

Here’s what else to know about the match:


MarketWatch illustration of how Team USA and Iran match up heading into their World Cup match.

The U.S. vs. Iran match begins at 2 p.m. Eastern, and can be watched or streamed on Fox in English (via your local Fox channel, fuboTV, FoxSports.com, the Fox Sports app) and Telemundo in Spanish (via fuboTV, Telemundo Deportes En Vivo and Peacock.)

World Cup 2022: How to watch, who’s favored to win and everything else you need to know

America has never beat Iran in a men’s soccer match, losing to Iran in 1998 and tying in 2000 — the only two previous times that the teams have squared off.

More World Cup at MarketWatch:

Qatar World Cup backlash is an important moment for soccer, says ESPN’s Shaka Hislop

‘It’s gonna be big’: Budweiser to host ‘victory celebration’ in World Cup winning nation with surplus Qatar beer

World Cup singer Maluma walks out of live interview over Qatar human rights question



Source link

Panic is not an investment strategy. How financial advisers can help you think through the unthinkable.


Financial planners spend much of their time preparing clients for an uncertain future. They cite worst-case scenarios and pepper clients with anxiety-inducing hypothetical questions. (For instance: What if you die tomorrow? What if your portfolio sinks 50%? What if someone in your family has a serious health crisis?)

So how do advisers help clients prepare for the worst and be optimistic? It’s helpful to transform anxiety into action, which gives clients a sense of control over what’s to come. Devising an action plan makes people feel as if they’re ready for anything, even calamities.

“I want to take away the fear,” says Scott Bishop, a Houston-based certified financial planner. “If people are worried, they don’t listen. It’s like when a doctor says, ‘You have cancer.’ You don’t hear anything else.”

Bishop has found an effective way to reduce client anxiety: He creates what he calls “survival guides” to help people brace for threats to their financial security. Through podcasts and articles, Bishop educates clients on how to be proactive in the face of recession or layoffs and other challenges. He urges them to research their options, ask smart questions and take practical steps to anticipate and address potential financial risks. “Don’t just worry about it,” he said. “Do something.”

Bishop calls his kits survival guides because he wants clients to confront their fears head-on and withstand whatever comes. “It is scary, so let’s put a plan in place to survive,” Bishop says. “Otherwise, people can be really complacent in their expectations,” get overly comfortable and cling to a status quo that can vanish in a flash.

To prepare for a layoff, for instance, he suggests developing a plan for managing cash if paychecks stop coming. At least six months of emergency funds is ideal.

People also need to imagine what their financial life would look like after a layoff. What ongoing expenses would they incur? What expenses could they cut (and perhaps cut them now to save money)? What are their loan options, such as a home equity line of credit?

“The last thing you’d want to do after getting laid off is buy a new car or have another big expense,” Bishop said. “So you’ll want to plan now to control your spending to make sure you can maintain your current lifestyle” if you’re temporarily jobless.

Bishop’s layoff survival guide also explores health insurance options and the cost of a monthly COBRA premium if they want to keep their employer-sponsored health coverage. He also suggests contacting the company’s human-resources representative about other post-layoff benefits. Questions might include:

  • Can I cash out my unused or unpaid vacation time?

  • What kind of severance package might I expect?

  • Can I borrow from my 401(k)?

  • Can I cash out my stock options?

Knowing these answers in advance may take some of the sting out of a layoff. This also allows for a clear understanding of what’s next, rather than panic.

“You can’t make good decisions in an emotional state,” Bishop said. “I don’t want you to worry about the next shoe dropping. It’s like fight-or-flight [response]: Can you make it better by running away from problems? Or is it better to confront them and prepare to solve them before they happen?”

More: I pay my adviser 1%, but feel like we have ‘poor communication’ and some ‘issues.’ Is this too much to pay and what’s the move here?

Plus: Investors are running towards the safety of cash — but here are 3 ways they could screw that all up, pros say



Source link