NPR bids farewell to Twitter, but not without flushing their credibility down the toilet some more

Last week, Twitter slapped a “state-affiliated media” label (and later a “government-funded media” label) on NPR’s Twitter page, and it was perfect. Not just because it was accurate, but also because it pissed off NPR. And we’re always here for that.

Well, fast-forward to today, and NPR is so pissed off that they’ve decided to take their ball and go home. Or at least leave Twitter:

More from NPR:

Twitter then revised its label on NPR’s account to “government-funded media.” The news organization says that is inaccurate and misleading, given that NPR is a private, nonprofit company with editorial independence. It receives less than 1 percent of its $300 million annual budget from the federally funded Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

Yet by going silent on Twitter, NPR’s chief executive says the network is protecting its credibility and its ability to produce journalism without “a shadow of negativity.”

Even if Twitter were to drop the designation altogether, Lansing says the network will not immediately return to the platform.

“At this point I have lost my faith in the decision-making at Twitter,” he says. “I would need some time to understand whether Twitter can be trusted again.” Lansing says individual NPR journalists and staffers can decide for themselves whether to continue using Twitter.

In an email to staff explaining the decision, Lansing wrote, “It would be a disservice to the serious work you all do here to continue to share it on a platform that is associating the federal charter for public media with an abandoning of editorial independence or standards.”

NPR has editorial independence or standards? Since when?

Well, NPR is not editorially independent, so … we’re not seeing the issue here.

Truth hurts, NPR.

If NPR doesn’t want to be labeled as government-funded media, then they can just stop accepting government (i.e. taxpayer) funding. Seems pretty simple.

Or, you know, they could just keep lying about who they are:

That first sentence in NPR’s tweet contains multiple lies. “Consequential”? Nope, not really. “Independent”? Not even remotely. “In service to the public”? Puh-leeeze.

It doesn’t. Which just goes to show you how weak — or, rather, nonexistent — NPR’s credibility actually is.

As does this:

NPR is leaving Twitter but totally fine with the CCP, which just so happens to be a huge fan of … state-affiliated media. How ‘about that?

 

Absolutely insane, and also absolutely shameful:

Twitter doesn’t deserve the privilege of being a home for NPR’s credibility, but TikTok does? Yeah, we’re done here.

And conveniently, NPR is not intellectually honest. Not about journalism, and not about themselves.

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Related:

NPR CEO’s statement on Twitter ‘state-affiliated media’ label only further solidifies NPR’s hackery

NPR TV critic says Chief Twit Elon Musk could have just spent five minutes listening to their content

Looks like NPR’s getting passive-aggressive after Twitter labeled them ‘state-affiliated media’

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#NPR #bids #farewell #Twitter #flushing #credibility #toilet

Rolling Stone left *major* stuff out of their scoop on ABC producer whose home got raided by FBI

In October 2022, Rolling Stone broke the story of ABC News national security producer James Meek’s apartment getting raided by the FBI under very mysterious circumstances.

We’ll get back to those last two tweets in a minute.

Rolling Stone editor in chief Noah Shachtman tweeted about the story as well:

Talk about a crazy story, right? Did we ever find out what actually happened?

As a matter of fact, there is an update to this story. And it’s a pretty major one:

Normally we’re not huge fans of NPR’s reporting, but we have to make an exception in this case because it’s nothing short of damning for Rolling Stone. Remember those last two tweets in the Rolling Stone thread, the ones suggesting that it wasn’t clear why the FBI would raid Meek’s house because Meek didn’t appear to have committed a crime? Yeah, well …

Once you get into NPR’s article, it should become clear pretty quickly why Rolling Stone left out the details they left out:

This is bad, guys:

It should have been a coup. Instead, acrimony inside the newsroom over how that scoop was edited led to accusations that the magazine’s brash leader pulled punches in overseeing coverage of someone he knew. The reporter who wrote the story, enraged, accepted a position at a sister publication two months later. And her complaints prompted a senior attorney for the magazine’s parent company to review what happened.

In the hours leading up to publication, Shachtman changed [article author Tatiana Siegel’s] draft to remove all suggestions that the investigation was not related to Meek’s reporting. He left in the finding that federal agents had allegedly found “classified information” on Meek’s devices.

The article left many readers with the distinct impression that the investigation was linked to Meek’s reporting — which could lead to a clash of the government and the press. Rolling Stone‘s official Twitter account promoted the story this way: “Exclusive: Emmy-winning ABC News producer James Gordon Meek had his home raided by the FBI. His colleagues say they haven’t seen him since.” The tweet’s thrust was echoed by WikiLeaksGlenn Beck and the Freedom of the Press Foundation, which wrote, “If this was related to his work, as this @RollingStone report suggests it might be, it is a gross press freedom violation.”

It sounds like Rolling Stone’s editor in chief deliberately buried the truth about the sex abuse allegations against Meek because the two of them were friendly. Meek looks really bad, obviously. But so does Noah Shachtman. And so does Rolling Stone. And it’s not like Rolling Stone has a whole lot of credibility to spare.

Yeah … that’s what scientists like to call “too little, too late.” And not having anything in the update about James Gordon Meek being chummy with Rolling Stone’s editor in chief makes it seem like Rolling Stone is still trying to keep the truth from readers.

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Thanksgiving Road Trip – Making a Difference by Tumble Science Podcast for Kids


In this special bonus episode, some of our favorite guest scientists answer listener questions! It’s like a Tumble reunion! Learn about the bugs you can find near your home, how ants let each other know about food finds, and if bats fly at night so they can eat more bugs. Thanks to Paloma, Liesel, and Bella for your questions!

We still have a few “encore shows” left to play while we get ready for the new season. You might have noticed we’ve had listeners introduce their favorite shows. Next week, that could be you! Send us a recording telling us your favorite episode and why you like it, to [email protected]. Or upload your recording to the “Contact” form on our website at www.sciencepodcastforkids.com.

Tumble has a few holiday shopping tips for you. First, don’t procrastinate. Second, don’t go to the mall. It is crazy there. Instead, go to seedling.com and order their fantastic activity kits, then use the code TUMBLE at checkout for $10 off a $30 purchase! So much better than going to the mall. Third, get a brand new Tumble tee, sent to you by Marshall’s mom, at our website for only $19.50! sciencepodcastforkids.com/shop

As always, we appreciate reviews on iTunes and emails! We read and respond to every single one. Lastly, we need your help with an audience survey for our partner, Wondery! Go to wondery.com/survey and answer a couple quick questions about your listening habits. We’ll be forever grateful to your anonymous contribution!





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The Tomb of the Animal Mummies by Tumble Science Podcast for Kids


In this special bonus episode, some of our favorite guest scientists answer listener questions! It’s like a Tumble reunion! Learn about the bugs you can find near your home, how ants let each other know about food finds, and if bats fly at night so they can eat more bugs. Thanks to Paloma, Liesel, and Bella for your questions!

We still have a few “encore shows” left to play while we get ready for the new season. You might have noticed we’ve had listeners introduce their favorite shows. Next week, that could be you! Send us a recording telling us your favorite episode and why you like it, to [email protected]. Or upload your recording to the “Contact” form on our website at www.sciencepodcastforkids.com.

Tumble has a few holiday shopping tips for you. First, don’t procrastinate. Second, don’t go to the mall. It is crazy there. Instead, go to seedling.com and order their fantastic activity kits, then use the code TUMBLE at checkout for $10 off a $30 purchase! So much better than going to the mall. Third, get a brand new Tumble tee, sent to you by Marshall’s mom, at our website for only $19.50! sciencepodcastforkids.com/shop

As always, we appreciate reviews on iTunes and emails! We read and respond to every single one. Lastly, we need your help with an audience survey for our partner, Wondery! Go to wondery.com/survey and answer a couple quick questions about your listening habits. We’ll be forever grateful to your anonymous contribution!





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