‘Inside Out 2’ arrives in theaters and could hit a 100-day run. Here’s why that’s increasingly rare

In Disney and Pixar’s “Inside Out 2,” Joy, Sadness, Anger, Fear and Disgust meet new emotions.

Disney | Pixar

Disney is looking to bring a little joy to theaters with its upcoming release of Pixar’s “Inside Out 2.”

Current expectations see the animated sequel easily topping $85 million during its domestic opening this weekend, which would make it the highest debut of any film released in the United States and Canada in 2024. Some are even forecasting the film could secure more than $100 million in ticket sales, a feat not seen since July 2023 when Warner Bros.’ “Barbie” waltzed into cinemas.

Already “Inside Out 2” has tallied $13 million from Thursday night preview showings in North America. For comparison, 2019’s “Toy Story 4” generated $12 million on its Thursday previews and snared $120.9 million for its opening weekend.

Any opening figure north of $50 million would be a boon for Pixar, which has struggled to regain its foothold at the box office in the wake of the pandemic. However, Disney seems confident in “Inside Out 2,” as the film is expected to have a 100-day theatrical run, a nearly unheard-of stint nowadays for animated features and non-blockbuster action flicks.

While most consumers are agnostic about theatrical release windows — the period of weeks or months that a film is shown exclusively in theaters before it hits streaming or other on-demand options — for cinema operators and box office analysts, a commitment to more than three months of exclusivity on the big screen is a big deal.

Before the pandemic, industry standard was what’s known as the 90-day theatrical window (though the average was actually closer to about 75 days in reality, according to market research firm The Numbers).

Only a rare few films would extend beyond that date — usually massive franchise films or blockbuster hits. After that time frame, a film could move into the home video space, which included digital downloads, DVD and Blu-Ray discs and availability on streaming sites. Films would still play in theaters after that date, but would then compete with home-market sales.

When the pandemic hit, and theaters were forced to close, studios had to decide if they were going to hold off on releasing their films until cinemas reopened or place them on streaming or video-on-demand during the interim.

Disney was one of the companies that opted to make a number of its animated offerings available in the at-home market during that time.

As theaters began to reopen, studios renegotiated the amount of time that films were required to remain on the big screen before they could go to the home market. After all, new Covid variants and a not-yet widely available vaccine had led many moviegoers to stay home. The result has been a widely variable time frame of exclusivity, as each studio negotiated its own deal with the major cinema chains.

For example, Universal and Focus Features inked a deal in which movies had to play in cinemas for at least three weekends, or 17 days, before those films could transition to the premium video on-demand platforms.

“Ninety-day windows were always going to be unsustainable,” said Jeff Kaufman, senior vice president of film and marketing at Malco Theaters. “The pandemic sort of accelerated that.”

The shifting theatrical windows has left studios and cinemas with a complex equation.

A shorter window

Studios had been pushing to slim down the window prior to the pandemic in order to cut down on marketing expenses, explained Daniel Loria, senior vice president of content strategy and editorial director at the Box Office Company.

Studios were paying a significant amount to market films for their theatrical release and then months later had to drum up buzz again for a film’s transition to the home market. With shorter windows, studios don’t need to spend as much to refamiliarize audiences with a film as it’s likely still fresh in their minds from its debut.

“My impression of films going to [premium video on-demand] early is usually a decision to not double dip on the marketing spend,” Loria said.

Last year, the average run of a widely released film was 39 days, according to The Numbers. So far in 2024, the average run is 29 days. Of course, as bigger blockbuster titles roll out in the summer months, that figure is expected to grow.

Average theatrical window by major Hollywood studio in 2023

  • Focus Features — 28 days
  • Lionsgate — 30 days
  • Universal — 30.8 days
  • Warner Bros. — 30.9 days
  • Paramount — 42.5 days
  • Sony — 47.75 days
  • 20th Century Fox — 60 days
  • Searchlight — 60 days
  • Disney — 62 days

Source: The Numbers

There are cases where studios have extended their runs well beyond the typical theatrical window. In 2022, for example, Paramount and Skydance’s “Top Gun: Maverick” played for more than 200 days in cinemas before heading to the home market.

And, these figures only refer to when a film becomes available in the home market for rent. Typically, the wait before films are available as part of subscription streaming services, often considered “free” by those subscribers, is much longer.

The Numbers reported the average time span between theatrical release and streaming subscription launch was 108 days in 2023.

Early on there were experiments with day-and-date releases, meaning films would hit cinemas and streaming at the same time. But that faded as studios realized these simultaneous releases cannibalized sales and led to increased piracy rates.

There’s also the consideration that many actors and directors have contract stipulations that award them a percentage of theatrical gains. In 2021, actress Scarlet Johannson sued Disney for releasing the 2020 Marvel film “Black Widow” on streaming and in theaters at the same time. She claimed that her agreement with the company guaranteed an exclusive theatrical release for her solo film, and her salary was based, in large part, on the box office performance. Johannson and Disney later settled for an undisclosed monetary sum.

Still, Universal has dabbled with the day-and-date model for horror movie fare around Halloween, opting most recently to release “Five Nights at Freddy’s” in theaters and on streamer Peacock at the same time. While the film had a stellar opening weekend, topping $80 million at the domestic box office, ticket sales shrunk more than 76% in the second weekend, reaching just $19 million.

Of course, shorter exclusivity and lower ticket sales can be bad for theater chains, which are still struggling to rebound operations after Covid. But some argue that getting the window wrong can be bad for the movie, too.

“A sufficient window is important not only to exhibitors, but also to our studio partners, as it’s necessary to deliver the full promotional and financial benefits of a film’s theatrical release, which continue to meaningfully enhance a film’s lifetime value across all distribution channels, including streaming,” said Sean Gamble, president and CEO of Cinemark.

Disney’s dilemma

It’s a lesson that Disney learned in the wake of the pandemic.

Both Walt Disney Animation and Pixar struggled to regain a foothold at the box office after pandemic restrictions lessened and audiences returned to theaters. Much of this was due to the fact that Disney opted to debut a handful of animated features directly on streaming service Disney+ during theatrical closures and even once cinemas had reopened.

The company sought to pad the company’s fledgling streaming service with content, stretching its creative teams thin and sending theatrical movies straight to digital.

That dynamic trained parents to seek out new Disney titles on streaming, not in theaters, even when Disney opted to return its films to the big screen.

As a result of that and other challenges, no Disney animated feature from Pixar or Walt Disney Animation has generated more than $480 million at the global box office since 2019. For comparison, just before the pandemic, “Coco” generated $796 million globally, while “Incredibles 2″ tallied $1.24 billion globally, and “Toy Story 4” snared $1.07 billion globally.

Box office experts are looking to “Inside Out 2” as a barometer for the health of Pixar and its future. If the film can capture attention from audiences and perform well over its opening weekend and beyond, the animation studios will regain goodwill from audiences and the industry.

Recent Pixar domestic opening weekend results

  • “Elemental” (2023) — $29.6 million
  • “Lightyear” (2022) — $50.5 million
  • “Turning Red” (2022) — streaming release
  • “Luca” (2021) — streaming release
  • “Soul” (2020) — streaming release
  • “Onward” (2020)* — $39.1 million
  • “Toy Story 4” (2019) — $120.9 million
  • “The Incredibles 2” (2018) — $182.6 million

* “Onward” was released just as Covid cases spiked in the U.S. and theaters began closing.

Source: The Numbers

A 100-day window for “Inside Out 2” may be the key.

Disney is one of the only studios that doesn’t have a traditional premium video on-demand window, according to Sebastian Gomez, a research and data analyst at The Numbers. Meaning, that once that theatrical window is up it will go to Disney+ where subscribers can watch it for free, rather than an intermediate rental option.

By delaying its at-home release, Disney is signaling to audiences that its latest Pixar release is a “must see” on the big screen.

The first “Inside Out” film, which hit theaters in 2015, generated $90.4 million during its opening weekend and tallied more than $850 million at the global box office.

Disclosure: Comcast is the parent company of NBCUniversal and CNBC.

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Raghubir Yadav On The Panchayat Effect: “Everywhere I Go, People Call Me Pradhan Ji”

Raghubir Yadav in Panchayat 3. (courtesy: YouTube)

New Delhi:

Almost four decades after his first film, more since his debut on stage and numerous small screen appearances later, veteran actor Raghubir Yadav says Panchayat has taken his success to the next level with people recognising him as “Pradhan ji” wherever he goes. “As if what I have done in the past is forgotten. I am Pradhan ji,” Raghubir Yadav, one of the most prominent faces of the parallel cinema and theatre movement whose career arc spans decades and mediums, told PTI.

The adulation after Panchayat, which revolves around the everyday struggles of people in an Uttar Pradesh village and is currently in its third season, also worries him. The OTT show has reintroduced him to audiences as the beloved and a little befuddled Pradhan ji, always looking to improve the lives of the people of his village.

“Everywhere I go, people call me Pradhan ji. Right now, I am shooting in Varanasi and people are wondering what is Pradhan ji doing amongst us,” he said in the phone interview from Varanasi.

The 66-year-old acknowledges the enormous success of the OTT show but is also wary of making too much of it in case it affects his performance.

“I will take it in only after there are no more seasons left. Right now, I just worry about the quality of the show. I don’t want to be too happy or sad,” he said. “The characters shown in the series were the kind of people I grew up with or met them during my Parsi theatre days. There was a simplicity and ease to life that is still inherent in our villages. That’s what the series has managed to translate without much artifice,” Raghubir Yadav said.

He grew up in one such village in Madhya Pradesh’s Jabalpur district. Ranjhi didn’t even have a school but was steeped in melody. He would sing film songs in local functions and perform bhajans in the temple built by his maternal grandfather. And that’s how he started dreaming of a career in music.

“Sometimes your wishes pave the way for you. I joined a Parsi theatre company run by (actor) Annu Kapoor’s father and worked there for six years. I would get Rs 2.50 daily and I count it among my best days. I would often go hungry but it taught me so much. Thodi takleef na ho to maza nahi aata,” he said. From the Parsi theatre in Madhya Pradesh, Yadav went on to study in Delhi’s National School of Drama where he stayed for 13 years as part of the repertory company, honing his talents as an actor and also singer.

“Since childhood, I don’t get too happy or sad about things. What people call a struggle, I believe is just motivation to work hard,” he said.

Recalling his student years in NSD, where “Panchayat” co-star Neena Gupta was his junior, Yadav recalled that Ebrahim Alkazi, then director of the drama school, asked him to choose his specialisation and he responded by saying he wanted to learn everything.

“And that’s how I came into stagecraft. All the students warned me that you will have to labour a lot but I went ahead with it. It has helped me a lot in acting. I never need any cues or the mark. I know where to stand, when to stop and how much distance there should be between co-actors while performing.

“I have a small workshop at home and when I am not doing anything, I craft little things like flutes and stuff. I also sometimes pick up the broom and clean the house or get into the kitchen. I find it therapeutic,” he added.

Gupta, who plays his on-screen wife Manju Devi in “Panchayat”, recently posted a picture of their youth which was circulated widely. Yadav said it feels surreal that their life has brought them to this moment.

“We did many plays together and while working on the show we realised we have travelled such a long distance and still are like family to each other. That’s how we behave when we are working on the show. This is a picture from when she was in NSD and I was in the repertory. That photo made us realise the journey we have had. That experience now reflects on our faces,” he said.

Acting, said the Mumbai-based artiste who first came to notice with Massey Sahib and the Doordarshan serial Mungeri Lal Ke Haseen Sapne, is a constant process of learning.

“The field of arts and culture is like an ocean. You can never have enough. If I am honest, I feel one lifetime is too short for it. There is so much to do for everyone. I feel I should learn the best I can and maybe I can excel in my next life because one life is not enough,” he said.

From playing Mungerilal, the day-dreaming protagonist of Mungerilal… to Pradhanji in “Panchayat”, it has been an interesting journey. The film debut came with Pradip Krishen’s “Massey Sahib”. And it has been quality over quantity for him ever since.

Raghubir Yadav has also featured in acclaimed films such as Salaam Bombay!, Suraj Ka Satvan Ghoda, Dharavi, Maya Memsaab, Bandit Queen and Saaz. Then there were commercial outings, including Dil Se.., Lagaan, Dilli 6, Peepli Live or Piku, Sandeep Aur Pinky Faraar and the latest Kathal.

His television outings have been equally impressive whether it was “Mungerilal Ke Haseen Sapne” or the Chacha Chowdhary of the beloved comic book adaptation. That’s not counting his theatre years and the music work that he has done over the years.

Not all the film roles were to his liking. It was challenging to say no to movies that were of inferior quality but came with attractive pay cheques, he said. However, he always felt he should stay true to his craft, he said.

“I always feel that I shouldn’t be doing something that does not feel right. You may earn money in the short term but what will you do after that. I come from theatre and understand the joy that comes from playing varied characters. In the other kind of work, you are playing the same character with different outfits after a point,” he said.

Raghubir Yadav was always invested in theatre, but the pandemic changed things for some time. Now that things are back to normal, he has planned not one but three stage shows in Delhi.

He is bringing back Piano, a Hindi adaptation of a Hungarian drama penned by Ferenc Karinthy, and then there is “Sanam Doob Gaye”. He is also adapting Hindi literature great Fanishwar Nath Renu’s famous story “Maare Gaye Gulfam for a play. “This is from Renuji’s story. I have also given music for it. Because I belong to the Parsi theatre, I have brought those elements in it. I have adapted it in my own way,” he said.

(Except for the headline, this story has not been edited by NDTV staff and is published from a syndicated feed.)

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Luxury homebuyers can now get an art collection as part of the deal

Los Angeles real estate company The Agency is selling homes complete with artwork and furniture. The piece shown is called “The McCoys II” (2019) and is by artist Shaina McCoy.

The Agency | Nils Timm

When Paul Lester joined a luxury real estate agency in Los Angeles, he decided to organize a Beverly Hills property viewing with a difference: he effectively turned it into an art opening, inviting prospective buyers of the home — and those who might be interested in purchasing the artwork he displayed in it.

Individual artworks sold, and so did the property — for a premium. “We were successful in selling the house I would say for a more of a valued number than you might expect, because the entire package was seen as elevated,” Lester told CNBC by phone. The buyer also purchased some of the art displayed.

That was more than a decade ago. Since then, Lester has made it his mandate to feature “significant” work by contemporary artists — alongside designer furniture — in the high-end properties he’s listing, which is often available to buy.

Lester, a partner at real estate firm The Agency, is currently selling several new-build luxury homes in Beverly Hills designed by architecture firm Olson Kundig, and has a put together a “full collection” of art in a handful of them.

Paul Lester, a partner at Los Angeles real estate firm The Agency, said he had made it his “mandate” to feature artwork in the properties the company sells. Seen here is the interior of a home that is part of a collection known as The Houses at 8899 Beverly. The artwork is “Rainbow Universe” (2015) by Lazaros.

The Agency | Nils Timm

The homes — known as The Houses at 8899 Beverly — start at around $5 million. Rather than simply being “staging” pieces brought in temporarily, the art and furniture is also available to purchase, Lester said. The Agency worked with consultancy Creative Art Partners on the homes, which feature work by a number of artists, including Michelle Mary Lee, an arts educator, and Irvin Pascal, a British sculptor and painter.

Homes that are ready to move into, known as “turnkey” properties, are becoming popular with buyers. “We do see people more than not right now — especially with new construction — wanting an entire package that works well,” Lester said. “There have been circumstances where people walk in and say ‘I want this room … I’ll take the furniture and I’ll take the art. I absolutely love it this way and is that possible?’ And we’re able to say ‘yes it is’,” Lester said.

The trick with choosing artwork for such properties is to make sure it works well with their interiors, said David Knowles, founder of art consultancy Artelier, which supplies art for real estate projects in the U.K., U.S. and the Middle East.

“It’s hard to get a kind of uniqueness and a character across if what they’re selling is a turnkey project, because the … art has got to appeal to a wide audience,” Knowles told CNBC by phone. “The art needs to feel like it belongs there,” he said.

To do that, Artelier might commission pieces that have a connection to the area the home is in, and has artists make pieces that will precisely fit the dimensions of the space. This tends to work better than borrowing work from a gallery to display in a home temporarily, Knowles said.

Artelier, an art consultancy, commissions work to fit the dimensions of a wall, or panels, as seen in this living area at a home in Eaton Place, London.

Fenton Whelan | Artelier

Lester’s team discusses whether the art should match a home’s design or contrast with it. They might chose a colorful palette for a more monochrome property, or a mix of abstract work and portraiture, Lester said. Work is sometimes commissioned for properties; other times, Lester might ask artists whether they have pieces available in a particular color.

Artelier has sourced artwork to hang on the walls of some of the world’s most prestigious addresses, such as London’s One Hyde Park, the residences at the Dorchester’s One at Palm development in Dubai, and for an apartment within Eighty Seven Park, an oval-shaped Miami beachfront building designed by Renzo Piano.

London developers are keen to appeal to overseas buyers looking for vacation homes in the city, Knowles said. The consultancy is commissioned by interior decorators or real estate developers to source artwork for wealthy property buyers who “know what they like, and they have got good taste. Or they’ve got someone that works for them that has got good taste,” Knowles said.

Artelier is often the bridge between artists and developers or property buyers, groups that “come from two different worlds,” Knowles said. He works with artists to help them understand that their work can be seen as a luxury product and that clients expect something “exceptional.” At the same time, Artelier might explain to clients that something like a bespoke ceramic piece is likely to have imperfections, such as finger marks.

Artelier commissioned a collection of artwork for the public areas at One at Palm Jumeirah, Dorchester Collection, a residential building in Dubai. The artwork displayed is by textile artist Kristy Kun.

Tooze Studio | Artelier

For Lester, the artwork in The Houses at 8899 Beverly creates an additional opportunity for marketing. “We’re about to start … a campaign, which is going to highlight the artists … which I’ve found to be very effective. So in effect, you’re getting another opportunity to tell the story about the home because you’re telling the story about the art as well,” he said.

The Houses are comparatively more affordable than other properties Lester has on his books. “I have several right now that are privately being offered … The house might be worth let’s say $60 million, $70 million, but the artwork in the house is probably worth $200 million,” he said. Buyers at that level might inquire whether the vendor would consider selling one or two of the artworks, Lester said.

While real estate agency Savills doesn’t often sell art as part of a property deal, the company’s co-head of prime central London, Richard Gutteridge, advises clients to leave artwork on the walls during viewings.

“It is an accessory that a lot of people do identify with. At the top of the market, it’s a layer of [that] lifestyle,” he told CNBC by phone. Gutteridge oversees sales in what he calls the city’s “golden postcode” — Belgravia, Chelsea, Knightsbridge and Mayfair. He said a home’s art collection is occasionally worth as much as the property.

“As much as that helps the [sales] journey, it’s quite nice when [buyers] refocus on the house … The artwork often turns people’s heads,” Gutteridge said.

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Shaking seats and piped-in fog: How 4DX is carving out a niche moviegoing market

Chris Hemsworth stars as the villainous Dementus in Warner Bros.’ “Furiosa: A Mad Max Saga.”

Warner Bros. Discovery

In George Miller’s new Mad Max film “Furiosa,” a red paint flare explodes and casts the theater screen in a saturated crimson cloud.

Feet away, among the rows of gyroscopic 4DX chairs, plumes of fog roll in, catching the red hue from the screen as if the flare somehow transcended the fourth wall and infiltrated the cinema. The fog parts, Chris Hemsworth as Dementus comes into focus and grins at the audience.

This is the 4DX viewing experience. It’s one of many multi-sensory moments programmed for “Furiosa: A Mad Max Saga,” which opened in theaters Friday, in order to immerse audiences in Miller’s latest visit to the vast Wasteland. And it amounts to a key value proposition at a time when cinemas are desperate to lure back moviegoers, particularly those in the younger demographics.

“We make movies different,” said Duncan Macdonald, head of worldwide marketing and theatre development for CJ 4DPlex Americas. “We are so different out there, with our motion capabilities and our environmental effects.”

In the wake of the pandemic, audiences grew used to shorter theatrical windows and having access to more content at home. At the same time, pandemic-related shutdowns and production stalls from two Hollywood strikes greatly limited the amount of content hitting theaters. As a result, consumers fell out of the habit of going to cinemas.

Moviegoers who have returned are seeking premium experiences — higher-quality picture and sound — and are willing to pay more for those tickets. 4DX is one option in the premium large format market alongside the likes of IMAX and Dolby Cinema. CJ 4DPlex also owns the ScreenX format.

“Premium movie theatre experiences are key to the health of the industry and with fewer films in the marketplace on average than in past years, the importance and essential nature of a company like 4DX comes into sharp focus,” said Paul Dergarabedian, senior media analyst at Comscore.

4DX utilizes motion seats, practical effects and sensory elements to immerse viewers in a movie. For Warner Bros.’ “Wonka,” the company piped in the smell of chocolate during screenings.

CJ 4DPlex Americas CEO Don Savant says the experience is “complementary” to routine moviegoing experiences, noting that 4DX cinemas attract younger consumers, predominantly in the 10-to-30 age range, who are seeking more experiential viewing.

4DX is a 4D film presentation system developed by CJ 4DPlex, a subsidiary of South Korean cinema chain CJ CGV. It allows films to be augmented with various practical effects, including motion-seats, wind, strobe lights, simulated-snow, and scents.

CJ 4DPlex

For consumers, the 4DX experience costs an average of $8 more than traditional ticket prices, meaning a ticket can range from $20 to $30 each. But the extra cost doesn’t seem to be detering audiences.

Last year, 4DX’s domestic locations tallied $53.4 million in ticket sales.

“Notably, the higher price for premium movie tickets is not a barrier to their success but rather seen as representing a solid value proposition for fans in pursuit of the best possible big screen experience,” Dergarabedian said. “This is good news for theater owners who, facing fewer wide release films in the marketplace, can boost revenues on a per-ticket basis while giving their patrons a great experience that will have them returning to the multiplex more often.” 

And, for major blockbuster titles, 4DX is proving to be even more popular. Ticket sales for Disney’s “Avatar: The Way of Water” topped $83.6 million from 4DX screens, or about 3.6% of the film’s total box office haul. It is currently the highest-grossing film for the screen format, Savant said.

“We want to give customers an easy excuse to leave their homes and visit a local Regal theater,” said CEO Eduardo Acuna of Regal Cinemas. “Premium formats like 4DX offer a movie-watching experience that cannot be replicated by any home theater setup. Each premium format serves a different purpose for storytelling, and each increases the enjoyment of watching a movie in a different and immersive way.”

Acuna noted that 4DX auditoriums are “a strong box office performer” for Regal.

Regal is the largest operator of 4DX screens domestically, with 50 of the 62 locations found in the U.S. and Canada. Globally, there are nearly 750 4DX screens with numerous theatrical partners. The highest volume is in Asia and Europe.

Savant said 4DX is adding around 25 to 30 screens per year worldwide, but is looking to push that figure up to 50 to 60 screens a year. The company is seeking to have around 1,200 4DX locations in the next five years. On average, each theater has around 140 seats.

Moviegoers who venture away from their couches and into a 4DX theater to see Warner Bros.’ “Furiosa” will feel from their seat the rev of motorcycles racing through the desert, smell gunpowder in the air during epic gun battles and even get hit with a soft spray of water as it’s flicked in the face of a character on the screen.

Last year, 4DX programmed more than 100 films for the souped-up viewing experience. Around 40 to 45 of those were major Hollywood titles, Savant said. Others included concert content, musical singalongs, anniversary titles and local language films.

Typically, the 4DX programmers, who are based in Seoul, have two to three weeks to craft the motion and special effects, although Savant said they can turn around a film in a week if the need arises. 4DX can program three titles at a time.

Both Macdonald and Savant referred to 4DX’s programmers as “artists,” describing the process — from the subwoofers in the seats to the fog machines — as different brushstrokes in a work of art.

“Every film is different,” said Macdonald. “So we look at the nuances of the different films that we have and how those are programmed.”

In some cases filmmakers will get involved, offering suggestions for when certain effects should be used and how subtle or bombastic they should feel or look.

“It’s the most dynamic way to see [a film],” Savant said.

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The 10 books the rich will be reading this summer

A version of this article first appeared in CNBC’s Inside Wealth newsletter with Robert Frank, a weekly guide to the high net worth investor and consumer. Sign up to receive future editions, straight to your inbox.

Today’s workaholic wealthy rarely have time to sit back and read a good book — except maybe for a few weeks in August. That’s why J.P. Morgan Private Bank, every May, releases its summer reading list, often serving as a book club for billionaires.

This year marks the 25th anniversary of the list, now called the J.P. Morgan Summer Reading List. The 10 books are carefully curated to match the tastes and preoccupations of J.P. Morgan’s wealthy clients. This year’s list includes books on effective communication, artificial intelligence, Formula One, whiskey, hidden vacation spots and the art collection of Alicia Keys and Swizz Beatz.

J.P. Morgan creates the list by surveying its more than 35,000 client advisors and employees globally and asking about the topics clients are talking and thinking about the most. This year, the advisors sent in more than 700 recommended book titles, which a committee whittled down based on timeliness and appeal.

“Our clients run the gamut from business owners and entrepreneurs to philanthropists and art collectors,” said Darin Oduyoye, chief communications officer of J.P. Morgan Asset and Wealth Management, who has spearheaded the list since its founding. “There are books to match up to each of those groups.”

Clients get an elegant J.P. Morgan-branded box with a book or two from the list, recommended specifically by their client advisor. The advisor also includes a handwritten note and a commemorative bookmark.

The list helps advisors connect with clients during the slow summer months. It also helps with client events, since authors on the list often agree to do special dinners or speaking events for J.P. Morgan clients.

Authors love being on the list as well since J.P. Morgan buys thousands of books to hand out and since clients often refer the books to others.

“The list is something that both clients and colleagues, and our communities, look forward to,” Oduyoye said.

This year’s 25th anniversary edition features a special “Anniversary Spotlight” highlighting Water.org, the charity founded by Gary White and Matt Damon, and their book “The Worth of Water.”

Here is J.P. Morgan’s 25th Annual Summer Reading List, along with summaries of the books, provided by the bank:

“Supercommunicators: How to Unlock the Secret Language of Connection” by Charles Duhigg

Sharing the latest research on what makes conversations effective, Charles Duhigg reveals how we can level up our communications and make stronger connections. Whether it’s a divided jury room or the way a CIA officer recruits a foreign agent, Duhigg uses examples to illustrate how we can deliver effective messages by recognizing and tapping into the three layers of every conversation—practical, emotional and social. Taking us from the writers’ room of one of television’s most successful sitcoms to the couches of in-demand marriage counselors, Duhigg shows us that we all have supercommunicators inside of us.

“The Anxious Generation: How the Great Rewiring of Childhood Is Causing an Epidemic of Mental Illness” by Jonathan Haidt

Social psychologist Jonathan Haidt lays out urgent facts—and issues a clear call to action—to focus attention on the global epidemic of teen mental illness. Haidt identifies the pervasive use of smartphones and over a dozen other mechanisms as having contributed to the “great rewiring of childhood.” Arguing that these technologies have had a profound negative effect on children’s social and neurological development, he explores what can be done to reverse the significant rise in sleep deprivation, fragmented attention, loneliness, addiction and social comparison. Importantly, Haidt calls for collective action and outlines steps that we all must take to end this epidemic.

Giants: Art from the Dean Collection of Swizz Beatz and Alicia Keys” published by Phaidon

Celebrating selections from the world-class art collection of musical and cultural icons Alicia Keys and Swizz Beatz (Kasseem Dean), “Giants” highlights 100 works by nearly 40 multigenerational Black American, African and African diasporic artists. Curated by the Brooklyn Museum for its first-ever major exhibition, the Dean Collection features works by legendary—as well as emerging—artists including Gordon Parks, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Lorna Simpson, Odili Donald Odita and Kennedy Yanko. “Giants” also includes exclusive conversations between Swizz Beatz, Alicia Keys and curator Kimberli Gant, in addition to interviews with 10 of the renowned artists featured.

“Brave New Words: How AI Will Revolutionize Education (and Why That’s a Good Thing)” by Salman Khan

Salman Khan, the visionary behind the nonprofit Khan Academy, explores how artificial intelligence (AI) is set to transform learning both in education and the workplace. Demonstrating how AI will not replace human interaction but rather enhance it with tools to encourage creativity and problem solving, he shows how AI can adapt to each student’s individual pace while identifying strengths and areas of improvement. Outlining how emerging technologies can create a more accessible education system, Khan offers practical implications for administrators, counselors and hiring managers, as well as thoughtful insights on how we all can use AI in an increasingly digital world.

“Love & Whiskey: The Remarkable True Story of Jack Daniel, His Master Distiller Nearest Green, and the Improbable Rise of Uncle Nearest” by Fawn Weaver

Entrepreneur Fawn Weaver reveals the untold story of one of America’s most iconic whiskey brands. Set in Lynchburg, Tennessee, “Love & Whiskey” follows Weaver’s quest to discover the life of Nearest Green, a 19th-century African American distiller who played a pivotal role in developing Jack Daniel’s whiskey. Navigating through layers of history to unlock the truth about Green’s contributions to the spirits industry and his friendship with Daniels, Weaver uncovers a story that connects generations. Her findings inspire a new path forward, with Weaver spearheading the creation of Uncle Nearest Premium Whiskey as a way to honor and celebrate Green’s legacy for generations to come.

“The Formula: How Rogues, Geniuses, and Speed Freaks Reengineered F1 into the World’s Fastest-Growing Sport” by Joshua Robinson and Jonathan Clegg

In “The Formula,” Joshua Robinson and Jonathan Clegg from The Wall Street Journal tell the riveting story of how Formula 1’s fearless reinvention led to its breakthrough in America. With fast cars, engineering geniuses, driver rivalries and glamorous settings, “The Formula” details how F1’s “sudden” arrival in the United States was actually decades in the making. With unfettered access to F1’s most legendary teams and icons from Ferrari to Mercedes, Robinson and Clegg give readers a thrilling look inside the drivers, corporations, cars and risks that have defined the world’s fastest-growing sport.

“Secret Stays: Pioneering Hosts of the New Chic” by Melinda Stevens, Issy von Simson and Tabitha Joyce

A fascinating exploration curated by Melinda Stevens, Issy von Simson and Tabitha Joyce, “Secret Stays” introduces 22 hidden gems that reflect the dynamic evolution of modern travel. Highlighting captivating properties and the people who own them—from a secluded Croatian monastery to a Japanese machiya townhome—this coffee table book from Assouline, the luxury brand on culture, reveals one-of-a-kind experiences that stem from a revived belief in genuine, bespoke hospitality. Through stunning photographs and compelling narratives, “Secret Stays” takes a fresh look at the diverse and ever-evolving face of travel today.

Finding Fortunato: How a Peruvian Adventure Inspired the Sweet Success of a Family Chocolate Business” by Adam Pearson

In “Finding Fortunato,” Adam Pearson takes us on a journey into the northern Peruvian jungle with the inspirational story of the entrepreneurial family who struck gold and discovered the legendary Nacional white cacao bean—previously thought to be extinct. Realizing their success was predicated on disrupting a traditional, unethical supply chain to instead trade directly with local Peruvian farmers, the family pioneered Fortunato Chocolate, a company that would come to be described as “the Rolex of chocolate.”

“Uptime: A Practical Guide to Personal Productivity and Wellbeing” by Laura Mae Martin

Every day, tens of thousands of Google employees, from interns to C-suite executives, rely on an executive productivity advisor—Laura Mae Martin—to make the most of their time. In “Uptime,” Martin provides easy-to-follow steps to boost productivity, prevent burnout and achieve a better work-life balance. Whether you face an avalanche of emails, an overloaded calendar or a difficult meeting to lead, Martin’s strategic approach lays out concrete steps to help you manage time efficiently, focus on priorities, and maintain effective systems and routines.

“The Secret Society of Aunts & Uncles” by Jake Gyllenhaal and Greta Caruso

A whimsical and heartwarming picture book by Academy Award and Tony Award nominee Jake Gyllenhaal and his childhood best friend Greta Caruso, “The Secret Society of Aunts & Uncles” celebrates the unique, fun-filled role aunts and uncles play in children’s lives. Humorously exploring the call to adventure that being an aunt or uncle can bring—from flexible bedtimes to activities with a “healthy dose of danger”—this book paints a loving portrait of these special relationships.

Anniversary Spotlight: “The Worth of Water: Our Story of Chasing Solutions to the World’s Greatest Challenge” by Gary White and Matt Damon

In celebration of the 225th anniversary of JPMorgan Chase’s earliest predecessor—the Manhattan Company, which was founded as a water works company—we are proud to spotlight “The Worth of Water” by Gary White and Matt Damon. These two unlikely allies, with a shared mission to end the global water crisis, take readers on a journey to empower communities and families with tools to address their potable water shortages. Outlining their trial-and-error approach to finding a workable solution, White and Damon demonstrate how the water crisis is solvable through collective action.

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Homeownership isn’t for everyone, money coach says: Don’t fall for artificial ‘pressure to buy’

Jannese Torres is the founder of the blog Delish D’Lites and the podcast “Yo Quiero Dinero.”

Photo Jannese Torres

In her upcoming book, “Financially Lit!: The Modern Latina’s Guide to Level Up Your Dinero & Become Financially Poderosa,” author Jannese Torres discusses how she became the first woman in her family to graduate from college, build a career and achieve what she believed were marks of success.

Yet in her pursuit of the American dream, she realized that she didn’t know what to do with her financial success. She also realized certain milestones, such as homeownership, often aren’t so much achievements as a new set of challenges.

“It’s just important for people not to just feel this pressure to buy a home because you’re a certain age or you’ve reached a certain life milestone,” said Torres, a Latina money expert who hosts the podcast “Yo Quiero Dinero” and an entrepreneurship coach who helps clients pursue financial independence.

As part of its National Financial Literacy Month efforts, CNBC will be featuring stories throughout the month dedicated to helping people manage, grow and protect their money so they can truly live ambitiously.

CNBC spoke with Torres in early April about what drove her to write her new book, how she has worked through “financial survivor’s guilt,” and why pursuing the American dream can become a nightmare for some.

(This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity).

‘Nobody talks about the grief that comes with growth’

“I wanted to write the book that I needed when I was graduating from high school and that could have saved me from making a lot of financial mistakes because I didn’t learn anything about money,” said Jannese Torres, author of “Financially Lit!: The Modern Latina’s Guide to Level Up Your Dinero & Become Financially Poderosa.”

Courtesy: Jannese Torres

Ana Teresa Solá: What drove you to write this book? 

Jannese Torres: When I was doing the market research for the book, one of the things that I did was look and see what the competitive market looked like out there, or if there is a reason that this book needs to exist. 

I couldn’t find a single book that was specifically marketed to the Latina community or Latinos in general being the majority minority in this country. 

Our families have told us to go and pursue the American dream, but we haven’t been given instructions for how to manage the emotions that come with it.

I felt like I wanted to write the book that I needed when I was graduating from high school and that could have saved me from making a lot of financial mistakes because I didn’t learn anything about money. The more that I’ve talked to folks through the podcast and through my social media platforms, that’s been a very common sentiment. We’re told to go to school, get a job and make money, but then that’s the end of the conversation. What do we actually do with it? 

ATS: Like many younger generations of Latinos in the U.S., you overcame many hurdles and achieved major goals. But you describe in the book that these milestones also come with a sense of guilt. Why is guilt tied to success? 

JT: I call it “financial survivor’s guilt” because this is one of those things that we have not been prepared for. Our families have told us to go and pursue the American dream, but we haven’t been given instructions for how to manage the emotions that come with it. Nobody talks about the grief that comes with growth. Nobody talks about what it feels like to be on the other side of the struggle when so many people that you love are still there and you feel powerless to help them all. 

Looking back at it now, it’s like I was making all these decisions because of what other people valued versus asking myself what I actually value.

It’s going to require folks to give themselves some compassion, and to be okay to feel those feelings. But don’t let them sabotage you. It’s going to require some boundaries that you learn to exercise and also being okay with feeling like you’re on this island by yourself. When you’re the first to do something, it’s always going to feel uncomfortable. But if we don’t have examples of people who can make it out, I think it’s going to be much harder for folks to believe that they can do it, too. 

‘I was over my head very quickly’

ATS: Walk me through the chapter or that point in time when you bought a house, but it wasn’t all you thought it would be. 

JT: Looking back at it now, I was falling victim to the American dream. As a first-generation kid, my parents didn’t invest. The only thing that we saw as examples of “making it” was when family members would buy homes: The sacrifices were worth it and this is the thing that you have to show for your success.

When you’re the first to do something, it’s always going to feel uncomfortable. But if we don’t have examples of people who can make it out, I think it’s going to be much harder for folks to believe that they can do it, too. 

Jannese Torres

Latina money expert and entrepreneurship coach

I definitely felt the pressure to keep up with the Joneses in that respect. I was turning 30 years old and I saw friends buying homes, getting married, doing all those things that are on the successful adult checklist of life. When I decided to purchase the home, it was coming from a place of, “Well, I need to do this too, because this is just what everybody does.”

I quickly realized that I bought a home in a place that I didn’t even want to live in. 

Looking back at it now, it’s like I was making all these decisions because of what other people valued versus asking myself what I actually value. The freedom to have that flexibility that comes with renting is something that I valued much more.

But I felt like I was falling victim to that narrative that says, “You’re wasting money if you rent, and successful adults purchase homes.” It took a lot of unlearning of those narratives and realizing that just because something works for one person doesn’t mean that it’s universally applicable. 

Homeownership is one of those things where more people need to question if they have the personality, lifestyle, or the value system for this, or are you just wanting to do it because that’s what everybody else is telling you to do. 

Jannese Torres

Courtesy: Jannese Torres

ATS: What would you tell someone who’s financially comfortable or has reached certain benchmarks where they could potentially invest in a property but are still wary about it? 

JT: One of the things that made me realize I was over my head very quickly was the fact that two weeks into moving into the home, I discovered that the basement would flood. The sewer line was blocked, and that was not something that we checked during inspection. I ended up having to spend $4,000 on replacing the pipe in the basement two weeks after moving in. That pretty much depleted the little money that I had left over after closing costs. 

I ended up having to take a 401(k) loan to pay for repairs and putting things on credit cards. It’s important to realize that closing costs, the fees and the down payment are just the beginning.

There’s this narrative where if you get a mortgage, then you’re going to be paying the same amount of money forever and that’s why you should buy a home instead of renting. And I’m like, “Absolutely not.” Your property taxes and insurance will increase. You’re not going to be able to predict when things go wrong in the home and when you need to fix something. 

You have to make sure you can afford the maintenance costs and the things that will inevitably come with homeownership. And from a value perspective, you have to really be honest with yourself: “Does this suit my lifestyle? Do I want to stay in this place for like a decade or more? … Or do I want the flexibility to give my landlord 30 days’ notice and be able to move somewhere else? Are you in a job that feels like it’s something you want to do long term? Or do you want to make a career pivot?”

‘The American dream is more of an illusion’

ATS: Do you think the American dream has changed? 

JT: I definitely do think that the American dream is in the process of being redefined because it has become so inaccessible, especially to the newer generations. I think there was this path to “success” where you could go to school, you could buy a home with a regular job, and previous generations were not saddled with the level of student loan debt and the cost of living was not as high. There’s factors in play that are making the American dream obsolete or at least inaccessible to people. 

We are seeing sort of this questioning of it and this shift. I think that the Great Recession was a big impetus for people starting to wonder. It feels very much like the American dream is more of an illusion for a lot of folks, and I am curious to see where it goes.

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Daytime Emmy Awards 2024: Full List Of Nominations. Details Inside

A still from Bold And Beautiful. (courtesy: YouTube)

Washington:

The nominations for the 51st annual Daytime Emmy Awards have been unveiled, setting the stage for a showdown between Netflix’s documentary series African Queens: Njinga and three long-standing daytime dramas: CBS’ The Bold and the Beautiful and The Young and the Restless, along with Peacock’s Days of Our Lives.

As per The Hollywood Reporter, each of these productions has snagged an impressive dozen nominations. Following closely behind is the enduring ABC soap opera General Hospital with 11 nominations.

In the talk show realm, The Kelly Clarkson Show has garnered the most nods with nine nominations, followed by The View with 7.

Some newcomers to the Emmy scene include Downey’s Dream Cars on Max for Best Lifestyle Program, Selena Chef: Home for the Holidays on Food Network for Culinary Series, Neighbours on Amazon Freevee for Daytime Drama, and Extraordinary Birder with Christian Cooper on Nat Geo for Travel, Adventure, and Nature, along with a nod for Best Daytime Personality in a non-daily format.

Among the surprises is the nomination of Eric Braeden, who received his first Emmy nod in 20 years for his portrayal of Victor Newman on The Young and the Restless.

Braeden, who previously declined submissions for consideration, last won the prestigious award in 1998.

The National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences has introduced changes to this year’s categories, including the elimination of Outstanding Younger Performer in a Daytime Drama and Outstanding Promotional Announcement categories.

Additionally, they merged the categories for Outstanding Writing for a Daytime Non-Fiction Series and Outstanding Writing for Daytime Non-Fiction Special into Outstanding Writing for a Daytime Non-Fiction Programme.

Moreover, the Daytime Programme Host category has been divided into two: Daytime Personality Daily and Daytime Personality Non-Daily.

The nominees span various categories, covering a wide array of daytime programming. Here’s a glimpse at the nominees for the 51st Daytime Emmy Awards:

DAYTIME DRAMA SERIES

The Bay

Popstar! TV

The Bold and the Beautiful

CBS

Days of our Lives

Peacock

General Hospital

ABC

Neighbours

Amazon Freevee

The Young and the Restless

CBS

DAYTIME TALK SERIES

The Jennifer Hudson Show

Syndicated

The Kelly Clarkson Show

Syndicated

Tamron Hall

Syndicated

Turning The Tables with Robin Roberts

Disney

The View

ABC

ENTERTAINMENT NEWS SERIES

Access Hollywood

Syndicated

Entertainment Tonight

Syndicated

Extra

Syndicated

CULINARY SERIES

Be My Guest with Ina Garten

Food Network

Family Dinner

Magnolia Network

Selena Chef: Home for the Holidays

Food Network

Valerie’s Home Cooking

Food Network

What Am I Eating? with Zooey Deschanel

Max

LEGAL/COURTROOM PROGRAMME

Hot Bench

Syndicated

Judy Justice

Amazon Freevee

Justice For The People with Judge Milian

Syndicated

The People’s Court

Syndicated

We The People with Judge Lauren Lake

Syndicated

TRAVEL, ADVENTURE AND NATURE PROGRAM

Animals Up Close with Bertie Gregory

National Geographic

Extraordinary Birder with Christian Cooper

National Geographic

Guy’s All-American Road Trip

Food Network

Mutual of Omaha’s Wild Kingdom Protecting the Wild

NBC

Street Somm

Tastemade

INSTRUCTIONAL/HOW-TO PROGRAM

Fixer to Fabulous

HGTV

Fixer Upper: The Hotel

Magnolia Network

Hack My Home

Netflix

Martha Gardens

Roku

Windy City Rehab

HGTV

LIFESTYLE PROGRAM

Downey’s Dream Cars

Max

George to the Rescue

NBC

Growing Floret

Magnolia Network

Homegrown

Magnolia Network

Live to 100: Secrets of the Blue Zones

Netflix

ARTS AND POPULAR CULTURE PROGRAM

Billion Dollar Babies: The True Story of the Cabbage Patch Kids

Vimeo

King of Collectibles: The Goldin Touch

Netflix

Off Script With The Hollywood Reporter

SundanceTV

Oprah and “The Color Purple” Journey

Max

Variety Studio: Actors on Actors

PBS

Working in the Theatre

AmericanTheatreWing.org

EDUCATIONAL AND INFORMATIONAL PROGRAM

African Queens: Njinga

Netflix

Harlem Globetrotters Play It Forward

NBC

Ireland Made with Love

PBS

Leveling Lincoln

PBS

What Really Happened: America’s Wild

National Geographic

DAYTIME SPECIAL

Culture Quest: Ukraine

PBS

Disney Parks Magical Christmas Day Parade

ABC

97th Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade

NBC

Recipe for Change: Celebrating Black Men

SpringHill

Unexpected

Hulu

SHORT FORM PROGRAM

Catalyst

LinkedIn News

The Dads

Netflix

Hollywood Atelier: Rob Pickens

The Hollywood Reporter

How Una Pizza Napoletana Became the No.1 Ranked Pizza in the World

Eater

Temple of Film: 100 Years of the Egyptian Theatre

Netflix

LEAD PERFORMANCE IN A DAYTIME DRAMA SERIES: FEMALE ACTOR

Tamara Braun as Ava Vitali

Days of our Lives

Peacock

Finola Hughes as Anna Devane

General Hospital

ABC

Katherine Kelly Lang as Brooke Logan

The Bold and the Beautiful

CBS

Annika Noelle as Hope Logan

The Bold and the Beautiful

CBS

Michelle Stafford as Phyllis Summers

The Young and the Restless

CBS

Cynthia Watros as Nina Reeves

General Hospital

ABC

LEAD PERFORMANCE IN A DAYTIME DRAMA SERIES: ACTOR

Eric Braeden as Victor Newman

The Young and the Restless

CBS

Scott Clifton as Liam Spencer

The Bold and the Beautiful

CBS

Thorsten Kaye as Ridge Forrester

The Bold and the Beautiful

CBS

Eric Martsolf as Brady Black

Days of Our Lives

Peacock

John McCook as Eric Forrester

The Bold and the Beautiful

CBS

SUPPORTING PERFORMANCE IN A DAYTIME DRAMA SERIES: FEMALE ACTOR

Jennifer Gareis as Donna Logan

The Bold and the Beautiful

CBS

Linsey Godfrey as Sarah Horton

Days of our Lives

Peacock

Courtney Hope as Sally Spectra

The Young and the Restless

CBS

Allison Lanier as Summer Newman Abbott

The Young and the Restless

CBS

Emily O’Brien as Gwen Rizczech

Days of our Lives

Peacock

SUPPORTING PERFORMANCE IN A DAYTIME DRAMA SERIES: ACTOR

Robert Gossett as Marshall Ashford

General Hospital

ABC

Bryton James as Devon Winters

The Young and the Restless

CBS

Wally Kurth as Justin Kiriakis

Days of our Lives

Peacock

A Martinez as Nardo Ramos

The Bay

Popstar! TV

Mike Manning as Caleb McKinnon

The Bay

Popstar! TV

GUEST PERFORMANCE IN A DAYTIME DRAMA SERIES

Linden Ashby as Cameron Kirsten

The Young and the Restless

CBS

Ashley Jones as Dr. Bridget Forrester

The Bold and the Beautiful

CBS

Alley Mills as Heather Webber

General Hospital

ABC

Guy Pearce as Mike Young

Neighbours

Amazon Freevee

Dick Van Dyke as Mystery Man/Timothy Robicheaux

Days of our Lives

Peacock

DAYTIME TALK SERIES HOST

Joy Behar, Whoopi Goldberg, Alyssa Farah Griffin, Sara Haines, Sunny Hostin, Ana Navarro

The View

ABC

Kelly Clarkson

The Kelly Clarkson Show

Syndicated

Mark Consuelos, Kelly Ripa

Live with Kelly and Mark

Syndicated

Akbar Gbajabiamila, Amanda Kloots, Natalie Morales, Jerry O’Connell, Sheryl Underwood

The Talk

CBS

Tamron Hall

Tamron Hall

Syndicated

CULINARY HOST

Lidia Bastianich

25 Years with Lidia: A Culinary Jubilee

PBS

Valerie Bertinelli

Valerie’s Home Cooking

Food Network

Eduardo Garcia

Big Sky Kitchen with Eduardo Garcia

Magnolia Network

Emeril Lagasse

Emeril Cooks

Roku

Sophia Roe

Counter Space

Tastemade

Buddy Valastro

Legends of the Fork

A&E

DAYTIME PERSONALITY – DAILY

Frank Caprio

Caught in Providence

Facebook Watch

Kevin Frazier, Nischelle Turner, Matt Cohen, Cassie DiLaura, Denny Directo, Will Marfuggi, Rachel Smith,

Entertainment Tonight

Syndicated

Deborah Norville, Steven Fabian, Lisa Guerrero, Ann Mercogliano, Jim Moret, Les Trent

Inside Edition

Syndicated

Robert Hernandez, Star Jones

Divorce Court

FOX

Judge Judy Sheindlin, Whitney Kumar, Kevin Rasco, Sarah Rose

Judy Justice

Amazon Freevee

DAYTIME PERSONALITY – NON-DAILY

Samantha Brown

Samantha Brown’s Places To Love

PBS

Derrick Campana

The Wizard of Paws

BYUtv

Christian Cooper

Extraordinary Birder with Christian Cooper

National Geographic

Zoe Francois, Andrew Zimmern

Holiday Party with Andrew & Zoe

Magnolia Network

Jet Tila

Ready Jet Cook

Food Network

WRITING TEAM FOR A DAYTIME DRAMA SERIES

The Bay

Popstar! TV

The Bold and the Beautiful

CBS

Days of our Lives

Peacock

General Hospital

ABC

The Young and the Restless

CBS

WRITING TEAM FOR A DAYTIME NON-FICTION PROGRAM

African Queens: Njinga

Netflix

Mutual of Omaha’s Wild Kingdom Protecting the Wild

NBC

Reconnecting Roots

PBS

Super Animals

Syndicated

Team Rubicon

Roku

DIRECTING TEAM FOR A DAYTIME DRAMA SERIES

The Bay

Popstar! TV

The Bold and the Beautiful

CBS

Days of our Lives

Peacock

General Hospital

ABC

The Young and the Restless

CBS

DIRECTING TEAM FOR A SINGLE-CAMERA DAYTIME NON-FICTION PROGRAM

African Queens: Njinga

Netflix

Billion Dollar Babies: The True Story of the Cabbage Patch Kids

Vimeo

Live to 100: Secrets of the Blue Zones

Netflix

Mutual of Omaha’s Wild Kingdom Protecting the Wild

NBC

Searching for Soul Food

Hulu

TrueSouth

ESPN I ABC I SEC Network

DIRECTING TEAM FOR A MULTIPLE CAMERA DAYTIME NON-FICTION PROGRAM

Disney Parks Magical Christmas Day Parade

ABC

The Drew Barrymore Show

Syndicated

The Kelly Clarkson Show

Syndicated

Turning The Tables with Robin Roberts

Disney

The View

ABC

OUTSTANDING MUSIC DIRECTION AND COMPOSITION

African Queens: Njinga

Netflix

Live to 100: Secrets of the Blue Zones

Netflix

Mutual of Omaha’s Wild Kingdom Protecting the Wild

NBC

Mysteries of the Faith

Netflix

Temple of Film: 100 Years of the Egyptian Theatre

Netflix

ORIGINAL SONG

“Shine”

General Hospital

ABC

“Unexpected Truth”

Unexpected

Hulu

“We’re Home”

Reconnecting Roots

PBS

LIGHTING DIRECTION

General Hospital

ABC

The Jennifer Hudson Show

Syndicated

The Kelly Clarkson Show

Syndicated

The View

ABC

TECHNICAL DIRECTION, CAMERAWORK, VIDEO

The Bold and the Beautiful

CBS

Days of our Lives

Peacock

Disney Parks Magical Christmas Day Parade

ABC

The Kelly Clarkson Show

Syndicated

CINEMATOGRAPHY

African Queens: Njinga

Netflix

Animals Up Close with Bertie Gregory

National Geographic

Live to 100: Secrets of the Blue Zones

Netflix

Living For The Dead

Hulu

Oracles of God: The Story of the Old Testament

CBN

SINGLE CAMERA EDITING

African Queens: Njinga

Netflix

Drive with Swizz Beatz

Hulu

Live to 100: Secrets of the Blue Zones

Netflix

Oprah and The Color Purple Journey

Max

Searching for Soul Food

Hulu

MULTIPLE CAMERA EDITING

Family Ingredients

PBS

The Kelly Clarkson Show

Syndicated

Team Rubicon

Roku

TrueSouth

ESPN|ABC|SEC|Network

The Wizard of Paws

BYUtv

OUTSTANDING LIVE SOUND MIXING AND SOUND EDITING

The Jennifer Hudson Show

Syndicated

The Kelly Clarkson Show

Syndicated

The Talk

CBS

Tamron Hall

Syndicated

SOUND MIXING AND SOUND EDITING

African Queens: Njinga

Netflix

Downey’s Dream Cars

Max

Drive with Swizz Beatz

Hulu

Live to 100: Secrets of the Blue Zones

Netflix

Temple of Film: 100 Years of the Egyptian Theatre

Netflix

MAIN TITLE AND GRAPHIC DESIGN

African Queens: Njinga

Netflix

Car Masters: Rust to Riches

Netflix

Searching for Soul Food

Hulu

Super Animals

Syndicated

Tex Mex Motors

Netflix

CASTING

African Queens: Njinga

Netflix

Days of our Lives

Peacock

General Hospital

ABC

Start Up

PBS

The Young and the Restless

CBS

ART DIRECTION/SET DECORATION/SCENIC DESIGN

African Queens: Njinga

Netflix

The Drew Barrymore Show

Syndicated

General Hospital

ABC

The Kelly Clarkson Show

Syndicated

The View

ABC

The Young and the Restless

CBS

COSTUME DESIGN/STYLING

African Queens: Njinga

Netflix

The Bold and the Beautiful

CBS

The Jennifer Hudson Show

Syndicated

Sherri

Syndicated

HAIRSTYLING AND MAKEUP

African Queens: Njinga

Netflix

The Drew Barrymore Show

Syndicated

Sherri

Syndicated

The View

ABC

The Young and the Restless

CBS

The ceremony, set to air live on June 7 on CBS and Paramount , promises to be an exciting celebration of excellence in daytime television.

As per The Hollywood Reporter, updates on the lifetime achievement honorees, hosts, presenters, and Silver and Gold Circle honorees will be announced soon.

The Daytime Emmy Awards continue to honor outstanding achievements in daytime television, showcasing the talent and creativity of the industry’s finest.

(Except for the headline, this story has not been edited by NDTV staff and is published from a syndicated feed.)

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Former hedge fund star says this is what will trigger the next bear market.

Much of Wall Street expects easing inflation, but an overshoot could dash hopes of a May rate cut, curtailing the S&P 500’s
SPX
waltz with 5,000, warn some.

Read: Arm’s frenzied stock rally continues as AI chase trumps valuation.

What might take this market down eventually? Our call of the day from former hedge-fund manager Russell Clark points to Japan, an island nation whose central bank is one of the last holdouts of loose monetary policy.

Note, Clark bailed on his perma bear RC Global Fund back in 2021 after wrongly betting against stocks for much of a decade. But he’s got a whole theory on why Japan matters so much.

In his substack post, Clark argues that the real bear-market trigger will come when the Bank of Japan ends quantitative easing. For starters, he argues we’re in a “pro-labor world” where a few things should be playing out: higher wages and lower jobless levels and interest rates higher than expected. Lining up with his expectations, real assets started to surge in late 2023 when the Fed started to go dovish, and the yield curve began to steepen.

From that point, not everything has been matching up so easily. He thought higher short-term rates would siphon off money from speculative assets, but then money flowed into cryptos like Tether and the Nasdaq recovered completely from a 2022 rout.

“I have been toying with the idea that semiconductors are a the new oil – and hence have become a strategic asset. This explains the surge in the Nasdaq and the Nikkei to a degree, but does not really explain tether or bitcoin very well,” he said.

So back to Japan and his not so popular explanation for why financial/speculative assets continue to trade so well.

“The Fed had high interest rates all through the 1990s, and dot-com bubble developed anyway. But during that time, the Bank of Japan only finally raised interest rates in 1999 and then the bubble burst,” he said.

He notes that when Japan began to tighten rates in late 2006, “everything started to unwind,” adding that the BOJ’s brief attempts [to] raise rates in 1996 could be blamed for the Asian Financial Crisis.

In Clark’s view, markets seem to have moved more with the Japan’s bank balance sheet than the Fed’s. The BOJ “invented” quantitative easing in the early 2000s, and the subprime crisis started not long after it removed that liquidity from the market in 2006, he notes.

“For really old investors, loose Japanese monetary policy also explained the bubble economy of the 1980s. BOJ Balance Sheet and S&P 500 have decent correlation in my book,” he said, offering the below chart:


Capital Flows and Asset Markets, Russell Clark.

Clark says that also helps explains why higher bond yields haven’t really hurt assets. “As JGB 10 yields have risen, the BOJ has committed to unlimited purchases to keep it below 1%,” he notes.

The two big takeaways here? “BOJ is the only central bank that matters…and that we need to get bearish the U.S. when the BOJ raises interest rates. Given the moves in bond markets and food inflation, this is a matter of time,” said Clark who says in light of his plans for a new fund, “a bear market would be extremely useful for me.” He’s watching the BOJ closely.

The markets

Pre-data, stock futures
ES00,
-0.41%

NQ00,
-0.80%

are down, while Treasury yields
BX:TMUBMUSD10Y

BX:TMUBMUSD02Y
hold steady. Oil
CL.1,
+0.79%

and gold
GC00,
+0.46%

are both higher. The Nikkei 225 index
JP:NIK
tapped 38,000 for the first time since 1990.

Key asset performance

Last

5d

1m

YTD

1y

S&P 500

5,021.84

1.60%

4.98%

5.28%

21.38%

Nasdaq Composite

15,942.55

2.21%

6.48%

6.20%

34.06%

10 year Treasury

4.181

7.83

11.45

30.03

42.81

Gold

2,038.10

-0.17%

-0.75%

-1.63%

9.33%

Oil

77.14

5.96%

6.02%

8.15%

-2.55%

Data: MarketWatch. Treasury yields change expressed in basis points

The buzz

Due at 8:30 a.m., January headline consumer prices are expected to dip to 2.9% for January, down from 3.4% in December and the lowest since March 2021. Monthly inflation is seen at 0.3%.

Biogen
BIIB,
+1.56%

stock is down on disappointing results and a slow launch for its Alzheimer’s treatment. A miss is also hitting Krispy Kreme
DNUT,
+1.99%
,
Coca-Cola
KO,
+0.24%

is up on a revenue rise, with Hasbro
HAS,
+1.38%
,
Molson Coors
TAP,
+3.12%

and Marriott
MAR,
+0.74%

still to come, followed by Airbnb
ABNB,
+4.20%
,
Akamai
AKAM,
-0.13%

and MGM Resorts
MGM,
+0.60%

after the close. Hasbro stock is plunging on an earnings miss.

JetBlue
JBLU,
+2.19%

is surging after billionaire activist investor Carl Icahn disclosed a near 10% stake and said his firm is discussing possible board representation.

Tripadvisor stock
TRIP,
+3.04%

is up 10% after the travel-services platform said it was considering a possible sale.

In a first, Russia put Estonia’s prime minister on a “wanted” list. Meanwhile, the U.S. Senate approved aid for Ukraine, Israel and Taiwan.

Best of the web

Why chocolate lovers will pay more this Valentine’s Day than they have in years

A startup wants to harvest lithium from America’s biggest saltwater lake.

Online gambling transactions hit nearly 15,000 per second during the Super Bowl.

The chart

Deutsche Bank has taken a deep dive into the might of the Magnificent Seven, and why they will continue to matter for investors. One reason? Nearly 40% of the world still doesn’t have internet access as the bank’s chart shows:

Top tickers

These were the top-searched tickers on MarketWatch as of 6 a.m.

Ticker

Security name

TSLA,
-2.81%
Tesla

NVDA,
+0.16%
Nvidia

ARM,
+29.30%
Arm Holdings

PLTR,
+2.75%
Palantir Technologies

NIO,
+2.53%
Nio

AMC,
+4.11%
AMC Entertainment

AAPL,
-0.90%
Apple

AMZN,
-1.21%
Amazon.com

MARA,
+14.19%
Marathon Digital

TSM,
-1.99%
NIO

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Check out On Watch by MarketWatch, a weekly podcast about the financial news we’re all watching – and how that’s affecting the economy and your wallet.

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In Memoriam 2023: The arts and entertainment stars we lost this year

From beloved “Friends” star Matthew Perry to style icon Jane Birkin, Euronews Culture remembers the arts and entertainment stars who died this year.

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Join us as we pay homage to some of the most notable figures in the realms of art and entertainment who bid us farewell over the past twelve months. 

It’s impossible to do justice to all the people who left an indelible mark on our lives either through their achievements, performances or strength of character but we wanted to celebrate the joy they spread and, the fun, fear, sadness or excitement they made us feel. 

For more on the stars from the world of music who passed this year, from Shane MacGowan to Tina Turner, check out our tribute page

The following names are listed chronologically by the dates of their deaths.

Lisa Loring (1958 – 2023)

Lisa Loring, who was the first actress to play Wednesday, the youngest member of the creepy, kooky, mysterious, spooky and ooky Addams Family, died aged 64.

Loring played the princess of all things morbid from 1964 to 1966 in The Addams Family, the first adaptation of Charles Addams’ New Yorker cartoons. 

She was just five years old when she was cast.

Paco Rabanne (1934 – 2023)

Renowned designer Paco Rabanne, one of the most seminal fashion figures of the 20th century, died aged 88. 

Over decades the Franco-Spanish couturier created memorable designs and developed several enticing scents that brought him success both on the catwalk and on the high streets, making him a household name. 

Raquel Welch (1940 – 2023)

Hollywood star Raquel Welch, whose emergence from the sea in a skimpy, furry bikini in the film ‘One Million Years B.C.’ made her an international sex symbol throughout the 1960s and ’70s, died aged 82.

Her curves and beauty also captured pop culture’s attention, with Playboy crowning her the “most desired woman” of the ’70s, despite never being completely naked in the magazine.

In addition to acting, Welch was a singer and dancer. 

And she surprised many critics and attracted positive reviews when she starred in the 1981 musical ‘Woman of the Year’ on Broadway, replacing Lauren Bacall. 

Lance Reddick (1962 – 2023)

Lance Reddick, the charismatic and prolific actor who appeared in major TV series like ‘The Wire’, ‘Fringe’ and ‘Bosch’, as well as in the John Wick franchise, died of natural causes at the age of 60.

The actor had been in the middle of a press tour for the fourth instalment of the John Wick movies, John Wick: Chapter 4

He played a recurring character named Charon, the concierge at the Continental Hotel who works alongside Keanu Reeves’ infamous hitman. 

Reddick was also slated to appear in the upcoming Ballerina spinoff, starring Ana de Armas.

Michael Lerner (1941 – 2023)

Academy Award-nominated American actor Michael Lerner died at the age of 81.

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The late actor was best known for his role as the film producer, Jack Lipnick, in Barton Fink (1991) which earned him a nomination for Best Supporting Actor at the Academy Awards.

He has also starred and appeared in other films and series: The Warden in No Escape (1994), Mel Horowitz on the television series Clueless (1996-97), Jerry Miller in The Beautician and the Beast(1997), Mayor Ebert in Roland Emmerich’s Godzilla (1998), Mr. Greenway in Elf (2003), and Senator Brickman in X-Men: Days of Future Past (2014). 

Barry Humphries (1934 – 2023)

Barry Humphries, best known for his comic creation Dame Edna Everage, died at the age of 89.

The Australian entertainer, who was particularly popular in the UK, appeared in West End shows including Maggie May and Oliver!.

His star rose further when the character of Dame Edna, a parody of suburban housewives, became a hit in the 1970s, even landing her own TV chat show, the Dame Edna Everage Experience, in the late 1980s.

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Known for her flamboyant glasses, wittily condescending attitude, lilac-rinsed hair and catchphrase “Hello possums!”, Humphries even wrote an autobiography called My Gorgeous Life, as the character.

Jerry Springer (1944 – 2023)

Jerry Springer, the onetime mayor of Cincinnati and news anchor turned legendary TV host, died at the age of 79. 

The American presenter was famous for his raucous talk show, The Jerry Springer Show, which featured a three-ring circus of dysfunctional families willing to bare all on weekday afternoons including brawls, obscenities, bleep-filled arguments and blurred images of nudity. 

At its peak, it was a ratings powerhouse and a US cultural pariah, synonymous with lurid drama.

Well in advance of Donald Trump’s political rise from reality TV stardom, Springer mulled a Senate run in 2003 that he surmised could draw on “non-traditional voters,” people “who believe most politics are bull.”

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Martin Amis (1949 – 2023)

Celebrated British author Martin Amis, known for his seminal novels, Money and London Fields, died at 73. 

Amis’ works were rebellious, witty and daring and made him one of the most prominent writers of his generation.

Money: A Suicide Note, a satire published in 1984, is considered one of his finest early works. It was included as one of the 100 best novels written in English by the Guardian which described it as a “zeitgeist book that remains one of the dominant novels of the 1980s.”

A film adaptation of Amis’s novel The Zone of Interest directed by Jonathan Glazer premiered at the Cannes Film Festival. 

Glenda Jackson (1936 – 2023)

Glenda Jackson, the Oscar-winning actress and former MP, died at the age of 87.

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The British trailblazer, who won two Academy Awards for Women In Love and A Touch of Class, as well as two more nominations, was an international star in the 1970s.

At the height of her career, she gave it all up for politics, acting as a Labour MP in north London from 1992 until 2015.

Alan Arkin (1934 – 2023)

Oscar-winning actor Alan Arkin, who had a decades-long career and won the Academy Award for best-supporting actor for his role in 2006’s Little Miss Sunshine, died at the age of 89. 

In the movie about a dysfunctional family on their way to a beauty pageant, he played a frail, foul-mouthed grandfather who was suffering from years of drug abuse.

Throughout his long career, Arkin was very prolific, appearing in more than 100 films and TV shows, nominated for four Oscars in total, including for his roles The Russians Are Coming, the Russians Are Coming and Argo,and was also a renowned director and author.

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Jane Birkin (1946 – 2023)

Jane Birkin, the Franco-British actress, singer and style icon died at the age of 76. 

She first came to public attention in Michelangelo Antonioni’s film Blow Up, where her nudity caused a scandal.

Birkin achieved international fame through her enduring musical and romantic collaboration with Serge Gainsbourg spanning a decade. 

In addition to her musical success, she enjoyed a prolific acting career, predominantly in French cinema, working with some of the world’s finest film-makers, including Jacques Rivette and Agnès Varda. 

Angus Cloud (1998 – 2023)

Angus Cloud, the actor who starred as the drug dealer Fezco “Fez” O’Neill on the HBO series “Euphoria” alongside Zendaya, died at the age of 25.

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To some, Cloud seemed so natural as Fez that they suspected he was identical to the character – a notion that Cloud pushed back against.

The part made Cloud the breakout star of one the buzziest shows on television. He was also cast to co-star in Scream 6 before his death. 

Mark Margolis (1939 – 2023)

Breaking Bad and Better Call Saul actor Mark Margolis, renowned for his portrayal of Hector Salamanca, passed away at the age of 83. 

Margolis, a versatile actor with a career spanning over five decades and more than 60 films, achieved widespread recognition for his role as the resentful former drug lord Salamanca. 

The role earned him an Emmy nomination for Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series in 2012. 

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Margolis also had notable roles in Scarface, Ace Ventura, and The Wrestler.

William Friedkin (1935 – 2023)

Oscar-winning director William Friedkin, who shot to global stardom with the release of the 1973 film, The Exorcist, died at the age of 87.

The Exorcist was a Hollywood blockbuster based on William Peter Blatty’s best-selling novel about a 12-year-old girl possessed by the devil.

The harrowing scenes of the girl’s possession and a splendid cast, including Linda Blair as the girl, Ellen Burstyn as her mother and Max Von Sydow and Jason Miller as the priests who try to exorcise the devil, helped make the film a box-office sensation. 

The film received 10 Oscar nominations, including one for Friedkin as director, and won two, for Blatty’s script and for sound.

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But it was two years prior that he won his first Oscar for ‘The French Connection’.

Friedkin continued working until his death. His latest film, The Caine Mutiny Court-Martial, starring Kiefer Sutherland premiered at this year’s Venice Film Festival. 

David McCallum (1933 – 2023)

Renowned actor David McCallum, celebrated for his role as a teenage heartthrob in the iconic 1960s series The Man From U.N.C.L.E. and later as the eccentric medical examiner in the immensely popular NCIS four decades later, died at the age of 90.

In NCIS, McCallum played Dr. Donald “Ducky” Mallard, a bookish pathologist for the Naval Criminal Investigation Service. 

Throughout his illustrious career, McCallum also made guest appearances on various TV shows, such as Murder, She Wrote and Sex and the City.

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Geneviève de Fontenay (1932 – 2023)

Geneviève de Fontenay, a historic and iconic figure in the Miss France pageant, died aged 90.

She took over sole management of the Miss France Committee in 1981, after the death of Louis de Fontenay.

Known for her strong character, and signature black and white outfits, she boycotted the centenary of beauty pageants in France organised by French channel TF1 at the end of 2020. 

Defending a conservative image of femininity, she was gradually ostracised.

Michael Gambon (1940 – 2023)

Veteran actor Sir Michael Gambon, best known for playing Hogwarts headmaster Albus Dumbledore in six of the eight Harry Potter films, died aged 82. 

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He was cast as the much-loved character after the death of his predecessor, Richard Harris, in 2002.

Although the Potter role raised Gambon’s international profile and introduced him to a new generation of fans, he had long been recognised as one of Britain’s leading actors.

His work spanned TV, theatre and radio, and he starred in dozens of films from The Cook, the Thief, His Wife & Her Lover, The Insider, Gosford Park to The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou , Hail, Caesar!, The King’s Speech, and the animated family movie Paddington.

Terence Davies (1945 – 2023)

British screenwriter and director Terence Davies, hailed by critics as one of the greatest filmmakers of his generation, died at the age of 77.

After making several experimental short films in the 70s and 80s, known as the Terence Davies’ trilogy, Davies made his feature debut with 1988’s Distant Voices, Still Lives, a semi-autobiographical film that remains to this day one of his most celebrated works.

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The lyrical film, which favoured imagery over dialogue, won the Cannes International Critics Prize in 1988, and in 2002 was voted the ninth-best film of the past 25 years by British film critics.

His final two feature films were centred around influential literary figures, Emily Dickinson in A Quiet Passion and Siegfried Sassoon in Benediction.

Burt Young (1940 – 2023)

Oscar-nominated actor, Burt Young, who played Paulie, the mumbling-and-grumbling best friend, corner man and brother-in-law of Sylvester Stallone in six Rocky films, died aged 83. 

Rocky was nominated for ten Oscars, including best supporting actor for Young. It won three, including best picture.

Young also had roles in acclaimed films and television shows including Chinatown, Once Upon a Time in America and The Sopranos, and guest-starring in MASH and Miami Vice.

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Richard Roundtree (1942 – 2023)

Richard Roundtree, the trailblazing actor who starred as the ultra-smooth private detective in several Shaft films beginning in the early 1970s, died at the age of 81.

He was considered as the first Black action hero and became one of the leading actors in the Blaxploitation genre through his New York street smart John Shaft character in the Gordon Parks-directed film in 1971.  

Roundtree’s character was part of a change in how Black movies were viewed in Hollywood, which failed to consider Black actors – especially for leading roles – in projects at the time. 

The Blaxploitation films were primarily aimed at the African American audiences, and later influenced directors such as Quentin Tarantino.

Through his 50-plus year career, Roundtree appeared in a number other notable films including Earthquake, City Heat, Roots, Maniac Cop, Se7en and What Men Want

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Matthew Perry (1969 – 2023)

Friends star Matthew Perry, the Emmy-nominated actor whose sarcastic, but lovable Chandler Bing was among television’s most famous and most quotable characters, died at 54.

Perry’s 10 seasons on Friends made him one of Hollywood’s most recognisable actors, starring opposite Jennifer Aniston, Courteney Cox, Matt LeBlanc, Lisa Kudrow and David Schwimmer as a friend group in New York.

As Chandler, he played the quick-witted, insecure and neurotic roommate of LeBlanc’s Joey and a close friend of Schwimmer’s Ross. 

The series was one of television’s biggest hits and has taken on a new life – and found surprising popularity with younger fans – in recent years on streaming services.

Perry also had several notable film roles, starring opposite Salma Hayek in the rom-com Fools Rush In and Bruce Willis in the crime comedy The Whole Nine Yards.

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Benjamin Zephaniah (1958 – 2023)

Birmingham-born writer and poet Benjamin Zephaniah, known for his poetry, music, acting roles, died aged 65.

Zephaniah moved to London in his 20s, where he published his first poetry collection ‘Pen Rhythm’ in 1980. 

Over his life, he went on to publish 14 poetry collections, five novels, a non-fiction biography of Mona Baptiste, five children’s books, seven plays, among many other works.

Alongside his writing work, Zephaniah has recorded extensive music, including seven studio albums. He also acted, most notably as recurring character Jeremiah Jesus in the BBC series Peaky Blinders.

Ryan O’Neal (1941 – 2023)

Hollywood actor Ryan O’Neal, who worked across genres with many of the era’s most celebrated directors, including Peter Bogdanovich on Paper Moon and _What’s Up, Doc?_and Stanley Kubrick on Barry Lyndon, died aged 82.

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The heartthrob actor went from a TV soap opera to an Oscar-nominated role in Love Story and delivered a wry performance opposite his charismatic nine-year-old daughter Tatum in Paper Moon.

Ryan O’Neal was nominated for best actor for 1970 tear-jerker drama Love Story, co-starring Ali MacGraw, about a young couple who fall in love, marry and discover she is dying of cancer. 

The romantic melodrama was the highest-grossing film of 1970, became one of Paramount Pictures’ biggest hits and collected seven Oscar nominations, including one for best picture. It won for best music.

Andre Braugher (1962 – 2023)

Andre Braugher, the Emmy-winning actor known for his role in the US comedy Brooklyn Nine-Nine and the gritty cop drama Homicide, Life on the Streets, died at the age of 61.

Known for his instantly recognisable deep voice, Braugher’s career spanned gritty drama and modern comedy, earning him critical acclaim and accolades, including two Emmys. 

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He won his first career Emmy for his role as Detective Frank Pembleton in Homicide: Life on the Street, a dark police drama based on a book by David Simon. 

He went on to play a very different kind of cop on a very different kind of show, shifting to comedy as Capt. Ray Holt on the beloved Andy Samberg-starring Brooklyn Nine-Nine.

It would run for eight seasons from 2013 to 2021 on Fox and NBC.

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Universal banks on ‘Migration’ to expand its animation lead over Disney

Universal and Illuminations latest animated film centers on a family of ducks who decides to leave the safety of a New England pond for an adventurous trip to Jamaica. However, their well-laid plans quickly go awry when they get lost and wind up in New York City.

Universal

Disney dropped the animation crown. Universal has picked it up.

And, with “Migration” opening Friday, the studio is looking to strengthen its grip.

“Migration,” a comic tale about a family of New England ducks that leave their pond for Jamaica, but end up in New York City, is expected to tally $25 million during its domestic debut. Universal has more conservative expectations, forecasting between $10 million and $15 million in ticket sales for the film’s opening.

While that pales in comparison to the $100 million-plus debuts of Illumination/Universal’s “The Super Mario Bros. Movie” and the latest “Minions” film, it’s comparable to the studio and DreamWorks Animation’s “Puss in Boots: The Last Wish,” which ran in theaters for several months, securing nearly $500 million globally.

“‘Migration,’ with solid word-of-mouth and strong reviews, will have to be judged more on its long-term results than the opening weekend splash,” said Paul Dergarabedian, senior media analyst at Comscore.

Disney’s most recent animated film “Wish” failed to connect with audiences. After generating $31.6 million domestically over the five-day Thanksgiving holiday, the film has grossed a total of $55.2 million in the U.S. and Canada. Globally, the film has reached $127.1 million. The film had a budget of $200 million, not including marketing costs.

For comparison, “Trolls Band Together,” which was released the week before Thanksgiving, secured $30 million for its three-day debut and nearly $180 million worldwide. The film had a budget of $95 million, not including marketing costs.

Representatives from Disney did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comment.

How Disney lost the crown

Ariana DeBose stars as Asha in Disney’s new animated film “Wish.”

Disney

Disney established its animated feature empire in the early 20th century with 1937’s “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs” and continued to dominate, more or less, into the 1980s and 1990s with “The Little Mermaid” and “Beauty and the Beast.”

Later, it acquired Pixar, which together with Walt Disney Animation, generated billions in box-office receipts for the company.

“The world of feature animation has been dominated for decades by Disney and for good reason,” said Dergarabedian. “They set the gold standard.”

Then came the Covid pandemic. While theaters closed, Disney sought to pad its fledgling streaming service Disney+ with content, stretching its creative teams thin, and sending theatrical movies during the pandemic straight to digital.

The decision trained parents to seek out new Disney titles on streaming, not theaters, even when Disney opted to return its films to the big screen. Compounding Disney’s woes was a general sense from audiences that the company’s content had grown overly existential and too concerned with social issues beyond the reach of children.

As a result, no Disney animated feature from Pixar or Walt Disney Animation has generated more than $480 million at the global box office since 2019.

“I think what’s changed is that Disney doesn’t get the benefit of the doubt,” said Josh Brown, CEO at Ritholtz Wealth Management and a CNBC contributor. “And people will not go to a movie just because it’s the latest Disney movie in the way that previous generations did.”

Universal appeal

But as moviegoers have returned to cinemas in the wake of the pandemic, more are gravitating toward Universal’s fare.

“Simply put, Illumination Animation’s only agenda is entertainment,” said Jeff Bock, senior box-office analyst at Exhibitor Relations. “Their animated films are sweet and simple and family audiences appreciate that. Disney sometimes attempts to pack too much into their animated features, and lately have been losing sight of the simplicity of the genre.”

Not to mention, Universal has been revisiting tried and true fan-favorite stories and characters. In fact, Illumination hasn’t released a nonfranchise film since 2016, and only three of the last 10 DreamWorks features have been original stories.

For comparison, of the last eight films released by a Disney animation studio, seven have been original films with just 2022’s “Lightyear,” a “Toy Story” spinoff, tied to an existing franchise. Previously, Disney has thrived bringing new animated material to audiences, but in the post-pandemic world, it has struggled.

It is the exact opposite strategy of Disney’s live-action theatrical releases, which have relied heavily on established franchises. Think “Indiana Jones and the Dial of Destiny,” “The Little Mermaid,” Marvel franchise films and “Haunted Mansion.”

Iger has said that Disney will continue to make sequels, without apology, but admitted that the company needs to be more selective in which franchises it revisits.

“I think there has to be a reason to make them, you have to have a good story,” Iger said during The New York Times’ DealBook Summit in late November.

“Minions: The Rise of Gru” is the sequel to the 2015 film, “Minions,” and spin-off/prequel to the main “Despicable Me” film series.

Universal

In animation, returning to popular characters and worlds is an easy way to capture the attention of parents and kids.

“Because they have seen these characters and related stories before, they have high confidence that they will be high quality, entertaining and ‘brand safe’ for their kids,” said Peter Csathy, founder and chair of advisory firm Creative Media. “And they may even anticipate franchise animated films as much as their kids.”

In developing consistent franchise content like Minions and Trolls, Universal is now able to introduce a new film like “Migration” with a sense of clout. Parents who see that the film is from the same studio that brought other fan favorites to the big screen are then more likely to come out to see it.

It’s what Pixar was able to do so well for nearly three decades.

“With ‘Minions,’ ‘Secret Life of Pets’ and ‘Sing,’ I think Illumination is a brand people are aware of by now,” said Bock. “And that awareness will boost ‘Migration’s’ flight pattern, likely extending its box-office run. That’s key. The long play.”

So far, “Migration” has generally favorable reviews from critics. If audiences respond well, and spread the word, the film could see a solid run, adding to the prestige of Universal’s animation brand.

“The kids animation market opportunity will never grow old, so those playing at the top of the game – as is Illumination – hold the promise and possibility of becoming the next go-to brand for quality animation after Pixar,” said Csathy.

Next year, Disney and Pixar are set to release “Inside Out 2” in June, while Universal and Illumination’s “Despicable Me 4” is scheduled to hit theaters weeks later in July.

Disclosure: NBCUniversal is the parent company of Universal Pictures and CNBC.

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